Hind end/back injury

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JaneDoe

Post   » Wed Aug 03, 2005 1:44 pm


Sorry for your loss :(

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diodora

Post   » Wed Aug 03, 2005 1:50 pm


I'm sorry you lost your favorite, every pig is the most wonderful and most special, but its so sad to lose a favorite.

Cooper

Post   » Wed Aug 03, 2005 1:59 pm


I can appreciate what you are going through, having lost a pig myself. Our current piggy Cooper is recooperating from a fall and Trevor's story was truly inspiring to us. I am so sorry for your loss. As someone else has said, remember that he was able to experience all the love you had for him, especially all the recent TLC he needed. Every piggy should be so lucky to have an owner like you.

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lisam

Post   » Wed Aug 03, 2005 1:59 pm


I'm so sorry.

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Barbara Osborn
Supporter from '05 - '12

Post   » Wed Aug 03, 2005 2:19 pm


Sleep well Trevor, you were very loved.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Wed Aug 03, 2005 2:55 pm


I am so very sorry, AliceMcmallis. I so wish this had not happened. I know you will miss him greatly.

GP Lover
My home, ruled by pigs!

Post   » Wed Aug 03, 2005 6:05 pm


I'm so sorry you lost him. He was well loved and you did good things for him.

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Wed Aug 03, 2005 7:33 pm


Alice, I'm so very sorry. Know that he knows how much he is loved. What you learned from loving him and caring for him will benefit many others, too.

There may be a connection between digestive problems and mobility problems. I certainly don't know for sure, but please do let us know what the necropsy results show.

Thinking of you and Trevor today. Godspeed and safe passage, little one. Run like the wind now, whole and healthy, and eat everything that is delicious.

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snowflakey
E's Moriarity

Post   » Wed Aug 03, 2005 9:12 pm


I am so sorry to hear about Trevor. I hope the necropsy gives you some answers. He was a great little guy, and you made his life so happy.

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AliceMcmallis
Supporter in '08

Post   » Fri Aug 05, 2005 10:03 am


I saw the vet last night and we discussed her findings. It is horrible. She said his stomach exploded. He was screaming and screaming, and now I know why. I knew he was in pain, but now that I look back I can tell the moment that it happened. He trusted me so much, he looked to me for everything in his life and I failed him at the worst possible time. I was so happy that I was going to get him back from the vet so I could say goodbye and pet him and kiss his forehead one last time. Now I can't bear to look at him because I feel so guilty.

She said this would usually happen if he had a blockage or torsion of his intestines but couldn't find any evidence of either of these things. I think it's just because he got so much gas and couldn't get it out, but we still don't know why he got that gas in the first place.

He had grass for the first time on Saturday, but the vet did not think it would have affected him so severely so many days after (it would have been three days after he ate the grass that he got gas). So now we'll wait and see what the lab person finds from all the samples. I'm not expecting much though.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Fri Aug 05, 2005 10:35 am


How horrible. I get chills thinking of him. Grill your vet to find out if there is anything any of us could do in a similar situation and how she would have handled this. Bloat can be so terribly deadly. I hope you get some answers regarding why this happened.

I feel so badly for you. This was such a tragedy.

All I can say is it is wrong to blame yourself for this. Sometimes things go wrong, we may not understand how much of an emergency it is at first -- it may seem we didn't move quickly enough -- it is only in hindsight the emergency seems clear -- and treatments may not come quickly enough. The vet arriving late didn't help either. I am so sorry.

GP Lover
My home, ruled by pigs!

Post   » Fri Aug 05, 2005 10:44 am


I started giving him simethicone, force feeding him, massaging his belly and put him on a heating pad. I gave him some metacam too. Through the night he pooped about 20 normal poos, peed a few times normally, but the gas got worse and worse.
You're being too hard on yourself. You did what you could as soon as you saw he was in distress. We all do the best we can with what we know. Sometimes what's going on inside is not noticeable. I know from experience they can have something deadly going on in the inside while they look fine...eating and drinking, etc. You saw something was wrong and took action asap.

I'm sorry about the outcome and it is very tragic and sad. I know how you feel.

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AliceMcmallis
Supporter in '08

Post   » Mon Aug 15, 2005 7:31 am


Here is the report from the histopathology of his tissues, hopefully someone can explain it more fully. My doctor went over it of course, but maybe I can get a bit more insight here.

"The serosal surface of the stomach is edematous and infiltrated by neutrophils, many of which are necrotic. Fibrin covers the serosal surface in one area. The neutrophils extend into the submucosa in one section.

The depression in the liver overlies an area of fibrosis and accumulation of lipofuscin-laden macrophages. Low numbers of neutrophils infiltrate the capsular surface at this site. However, more diffuse lesions of peritonitis are not present in the hepatic capsule. A moderate degree of lipid accumulation is present in the hepatocytes. In the heart, there is a localized area of infiltration of lymphocytes and neutrophils within the subendocardial connective tissue. Lymphocytes form cuffs around blood vessels in the lung (normal in guinea pigs). The lung is deeply congested. Histologic lesions are not present in the sections of spleen, kidney, or cecum.

DIAGNOSIS:

1. Supportive Peritonitis

2. Moderate Hepatic Lipidosis

3. Focal Lymphocytic and Suppurative Mural Endocarditis

Comment:

Although gastric rupture occurs relatively commonly after death in guinea pigs, the presence of an inlammatory infiltrate on the serosal surface of the stomach implies that it was an antemortem event in this case. A specific cause is not evident. The bloating may be the consequence of gastric distention prior to rupture, or gas accumulation in the peritoneal cavity secondary to the peritoneal infection."

Juliemarie

Post   » Mon Aug 15, 2005 8:36 am


Poor, poor baby. Iam so sorry for you both.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Mon Aug 15, 2005 10:23 am


I don't know enough to know if it was something other than the rupture that caused his death.

I still feel so badly for you. Hopefully Josephine can enlighten us.

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Amy0204
We miss our sweet Oreo

Post   » Mon Aug 15, 2005 10:29 am


I am truly sorry for your loss and I hope you won't beat yourself up too much. My Toffee suffered a similar fate. I didn't have the best Exotics Vet at the time, although her body was sent out for a necropsy. All we knew is that she had ringworm, had been treated with an antibioitic that is known to create tummy problems, and went very suddenly. I had taken her to the vet where they were going to administer fluids and observe her, but she had several "seizures" within a few hours and never came out of the final one. There was evidence of peritonitus and liver damage. She was only 3 months old, but had been with us long enough to be missed...we loved her. I cannot begin to imagine the pain you're going through now...please, please don't blame yourself.

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salana
GL is Just Peachy

Post   » Mon Aug 15, 2005 10:50 am


I believe neutrophils and lymphocytes are white blood cells, which would indicate an infection in the stomach and heart. I wonder if the infection weakened his stomach wall.

Josephine
Little Jo Wheek

Post   » Thu Aug 18, 2005 11:47 am


It does look like there was peritonitis prior to death, so that does mean the stomach possibly ruptured and he went septic. We see this in GDV in dogs sometimes, either pre- or post- surgery. Even when this is caught early, the prognosis is very serious to grave in other animals. It does cause intense pain. The pathology suggestion that it was caused by torsion, intestinal obstruction, or GI stasis is reasonable. Those are the rule-outs for that problem.

The hepatic lipidosis is a side effect of not eating or getting enough nutrition in when not eating. Pretty bad prognosis by itself.

The heart infection is most likely due from some systemic infection. It does take a bit of time, but I'm not sure how much time to establish itself. I don't know if we're talking hours or weeks. Any infection left to its own devices can and usually will spread to the heart. I think that's a reason pigs with dental abscesses or other abscesses will also have heart problems. Usually ultrasound is needed to distinguish the heart problem from something congenital, infectious, or acquired. We see heart infections/murmurs caused by serious dental disease in dogs and cats also.

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AliceMcmallis
Supporter in '08

Post   » Thu Aug 18, 2005 12:46 pm


The hepatic lipidosis is a side effect of not eating or getting enough nutrition in when not eating. Pretty bad prognosis by itself.


Could this have been something that was caused by his previous malnourishment before I got him?

He was gaining weight over the weekend. I saw him eating Monday night and Tuesday morning. I fed him Critical Care Tuesday night. I just don't understand how this could have happened so quickly. Unless he stopped eating right after I left for work Tuesday morning and between 6:30 am and 8 pm he didn't eat anything at all? Would that make sense?

Or maybe although I saw him eating he wasn't eating enough to get proper nutrition? However, I weighed him Monday evening and he had gained weight from a few days before, he was perky and moving about the cage like normal.

Where could the systemic infection that affected his heart have come from? Just anything? Could it possibly have been from his bladder stone surgery months earlier?

So here's what I'm getting from this: he had an infection, it made him feel bad so he stopped eating, which caused the gas, which caused the stasis, which caused the stomach rupture, which caused his death... Does that sound right?

Or with the infection having travelled to his heart is it unlikely he would have made it anyway? Do you think what salana suggested about the infection possibly weakening the stomach wall is possible?

This is so sad, it's like a desperate attempt to find some way that it wasn't my fault. I will have to take all of this to my vet and discuss it with her as well at length. Thanks for all your support and suggestions everyone. It's greatly appreciated.

Josephine
Little Jo Wheek

Post   » Thu Aug 18, 2005 2:14 pm


I've never heard anything like Salana suggests.

I think your assessment of the progression is likely. Usually hepatic lipidosis animals don't survive very long. It's not a chronic-type problem. Even though he was being force-fed, it may not have reversed a hepatic lipidosis that had already set in. We put feeding tubes in cats with this problem. Not very feasible for cavies. They stress out way too much.

The heart disease would have complicated things, certainly. I have no idea where the initial infection came from. It doesn't sound like the pathologist made too many guesses on that either. It could have been something that had been going on for some time and been subclinical.

The peritonitis and stomach rupture was not chronic, though.

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