Quarantine - why you should do it

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Sun Nov 08, 2009 11:37 am


I'm sorry you had such a lousy experience, Kaylee. This person sounds particularly clueless.

jedifreac

Post   » Sun Nov 08, 2009 1:51 pm


I do understand that everyone on this forum is down on purebreds, but please do not be so judgemental.

zootech, I probably should have been more clear. People on these frums aren't down on breeders because of the purebred issue (which doesn't really affect guinea pigs since there's no temperament or breed traits other than appearances.) The beef is more with actual breeding practices.

Pregnancy is always a risk for female guinea pigs. Accidental pregnancy is one thing, but deliberately endangering female pigs is another. It does not help that for whatever reason, many breeders do not follow basic care standards, increasing the risk for health problems. As you learned, even a reputable breeder can have a parasite infestation in an infant herd. Other breeders sell stock to pet stores or cull for showing. Many breeders are ignorant of proper guinea pig care, and it does not help that they contribute to the overpopulation problem.

On the rare occasion there is a breeder who wants the best for their piggies and does take good care of them, but rescues tend to have run ins with more bad than the good. Maybe if breeders caused less problems for rescues, some people would be more open to them. But to many people, breeding deliberately is in itself an unconscionable risk to the sow.

So, it's not anti-purebred prejudice. It's more about breeding practices and how they contribute to the sick guinea pig overpopulation problem--while other guinea pigs languish in the shelter and are put down for being unwanted. And until breeders follow care standards to prevent disease transmission, it is always wise to quarentine!

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Kaylee

Post   » Sun Nov 08, 2009 2:40 pm


I'm sorry you had such a lousy experience, Kaylee. This person sounds particularly clueless.
She's nuts. She even got mad at me because I told her onions were bad for piggies. Apparently, she feeds it occasionally to her pigs and they "have not died from it yet!!" Not that she bothers to actually figure out what was wrong when her guineas dies...

User avatar
Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Sun Nov 08, 2009 9:56 pm


I can't imagine guinea pigs liking onions!

I don't think they are poisonous (we can eat them).

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Kaylee

Post   » Mon Nov 09, 2009 9:59 am


Okies. Someone (on GL, I think? Can't remember) told me onions were bad for piggies.

The worst part is probably the lack of space and vet care, though.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Mon Nov 09, 2009 10:02 am


I don't think they're at all good. I just don't think they're poisonous and I think guinea pigs would hate them.

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Kaylee

Post   » Mon Nov 09, 2009 10:18 am


True true. My piggies back away if I got onion-breath, so I doubt they'll ever try to eat it.

zootech

Post   » Thu Nov 12, 2009 7:13 am


I don't that there is any factual information on onions and guinea pigs, but onions can be fatal to other animals so I am sure there is a possibility. It can cause autoimmune hemolytic anemia in some animals that can lead to death.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Nov 12, 2009 9:32 am


I don't know if this is helpful or not, but I found this (it also indicates cows have to eat a hell of a lot of onions to have any problems - 25% of diet).

Anyway, from an article in "Veterinary Technician" - http://www.aspcapro.org/animal-poison-control/documents/x-vettech_0801.pdf :

Large Animals
Of large animals, cattle are the most susceptible to onion toxicity. Horses are not as susceptible, and sheep and goats are somewhat resistant. In areas where onions are grown commercially, sheep may be fed cull onions (deemed unfit for human consumption) free choice without experiencing toxicity; for cattle, ingestion of more than 25% of their diet as onions may be hazardous.1 While it does not explain the relative resistance of sheep and goats, the oxidative threat to cattle is greater because onions also contain S-methylcysteine sulfoxide (SMCO). SMCO is metabolized in the rumen, producing dimethyl disulfide, another oxidant. Because SMCO is absorbed in the intestine and not converted to dimethyl disulfide, it does not affect nonruminants, including hindgut fermentors (e.g., rabbits, guinea pigs, horses).1

jedifreac

Post   » Thu Nov 12, 2009 1:53 pm


Interesting. Still not feeding them onions though. They've already got stank butt; last thing I need is pigs with onion breath.

User avatar
Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Nov 12, 2009 5:56 pm


Oh, I would not feed them onions either! I just can't imagine guinea pigs liking them!

Suisan

Post   » Thu Nov 12, 2009 7:57 pm


Lynx, thanks for that link on the onions. I was always told that onions were bad for horses and assumed the same must be true for guinea pigs. Fascinating to read otherwise. The things you learn these days.

Nonetheless, I still won't be feeding my guinea pigs leeks, chives, garlic or onions.

angrygreenfraggl

Post   » Thu Jun 20, 2013 10:22 pm


Good topic, I have learned this the hard way. You would be amazed at what pet stores guinea pigs carry. I bought a guinea pig from a pet store and it had ring worm and mites. A pet that cost 35 ended up being more like 200 after the vet bills. I will always adopt from that point on...lesson learned.

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