New rescue: Underweight Boar

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rshevin

Post   » Sat Nov 04, 2006 9:52 pm


I gave him a soft wipe with a warm washrag. Nothing really changed but he didn't squeal in pain either. I may have some vaseline I can put a tiny bit of on there tonight.

The only house resident with opposible thumbs fell asleep on the couch for 2 hours and so didn't make it to the drug store tonight but will be there bright and early tomorrow. I'll use the opportunity to treat myself to some coffee from the heavenly local place. Yum.

The only concern I have with a Spot name is that my 20 year old cockatiel's name is Spot. I don't know if that'd be weird to name them the same thing or not, although Semi-Spot is hilarious.

dragnsl

Post   » Sat Nov 04, 2006 9:53 pm


Definitely looks fungal to me which is extremely common in the poor rescue guys which come in on nasty bedding. And of course the mites are incidental because a lot of times they are not using the kiln dried bedding to begin with (if they are using wood shavings) so the bugs come in on it and voila! bugs on poor piggy!

So Ivermectin a very good idea, the clotrimazole a good idea and wait on the bath like you said. After you bathe him, wait a few hours to put the cream on him cause it can burn once you get all that extra scrufy stuff off and get a bit red and then they bug at it a bit. I found that out once and ended up bathing the pig again to get the cream off. I felt so miserable because I had no idea!

You are also lucky he took to hay right away! Some of my fosters take a week or more to decide that it is edible and delicious!

He is adorable and 750ish is not bad; could be better but he seems to have a healthy appetite so don't worry yet.

Good luck and love on the adorable little guinea pig for us!

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dgarriques
Got Pigs?

Post   » Sat Nov 04, 2006 9:53 pm


You could call him "Semi" for short. Ph a bird named Spot how cute, sometime we need to see a picture of Bird Spot.

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rshevin

Post   » Sat Nov 04, 2006 9:59 pm


This is my "husband" Spot. I was 5 or 6 years old when we got him and I was the one who picked the name. Not only does he have spots, he leaves them too.

Image

I think I'm definately in for a combination of treatments but if I'm lucky, everything is external. The ivermectin, monistat, and diaper cream all sound very safe and benign to me.

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dgarriques
Got Pigs?

Post   » Sat Nov 04, 2006 10:04 pm


Ahh Bird Spot is adorable. Sure doesnt look to be 20. How long do they live?

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Sat Nov 04, 2006 10:05 pm


It's nice to honor Spot, but I think this guy deserves a name of his own.

Maybe ask Mum to name him in honor? Or ask her daughter?

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rshevin

Post   » Sat Nov 04, 2006 10:06 pm


Average livespan is I think 15 years. His vet has only seen a small handful this old. He does have some physical symptoms of age though, decreased strength and muscle tone, poor balance, sleeps more but overall, he's doing alright.

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dgarriques
Got Pigs?

Post   » Sat Nov 04, 2006 10:08 pm


I like Talishans idea. Ask Mum's daughter (who named my little spot boy) and that would be a nice tribute. Then Bird Spot would not have to share his name and your new baby will have a name all on his own. Great idea Talishan!

HollyT
Get on your bike.

Post   » Sat Nov 04, 2006 10:09 pm


dragnsl, mites do not come from bedding. They cannot live without a host.

Fweeprluvr

Post   » Sat Nov 04, 2006 10:14 pm


Ok, I put the word "Spot" into the online Thesaurus and got this.

Entry Word: spot
Function: noun
Synonyms blotch, dapple, dot, eyespot, fleck, mottle, patch, point, speck, speckle, splotch
Related Words birthmark, freckle, mole; blot, mark, smear, smudge, stain; spatter, splash

How about "Mark". Nobody but us would know that his name was in honor of our dear "Spot".


or how about "OutDamn" ;)

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dgarriques
Got Pigs?

Post   » Sat Nov 04, 2006 10:17 pm


Mark, how cute. Well whatever you name him, he is lucky to have you now.

dragnsl

Post   » Sat Nov 04, 2006 10:30 pm


Yes they can. All the scientific evidence states that mites can be passed from infested bedding. The mites don't die as soon as they fall off the host, they search for another during their several week lifespan. They also lay eggs during that time which hatch and then they search for a host. They are like fleas and ticks and are in the same class of bugs.

You can have a perfectly healthy colony of animals with no history of bugs and then bring in a non-kiln dried bug-ridden bag of shavings and then your whole house is infested. The kiln-drying kills the bugs and burns off the aromatic oils. It also kills running lice.

Prior to starting my rescue and before I knew any better I was using "pet store shavings" and my Nigel never had any contact with any other guinea pig. I never had any other contact with any other guinea pig or any type of rodent for that matter. He had health checkups and was perfectly healthy and lived to the ripe old age of 9, bless his little soul. One bag of shavings later he had a horrible case of mites! I started doing mounds of research and this is what I learned. I brought bugs to my baby.

Bugs are resilient and they will find a way. You can get them from bedding.

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rshevin

Post   » Sat Nov 04, 2006 10:42 pm


Fweep, those are all very cute names. I like the subtle reference to Spot. I always like to sit on names for a little while, but I definately like several.

I have no idea if mites come from bedding or not. All I know is I'm bringing a new, dirty pig into my home, a friend has ivermectin, and he might as well get treated. I might give an oral dose too, in case he has internal parasites too. My Piggy hasn't been treated in over 2 years and I think it'll save a lot of headache to treat him at the same time so in case my quarentine doesn't work perfectly, we won't have a cycle.

I am feeling relieved having all this solid input. Any suggestions about when to start introducing veggies? I'm almost tempted to give him a little lettuce tonight since his stools are so normal.

dragnsl

Post   » Sat Nov 04, 2006 10:48 pm


I would wait until the morning and let him munch on hay throughout the night and just chill out from the stress of the day. I start all my fosters on veggies on day 2 as a general rule, personally.

Spot the bird is beautiful. Nathan, my cockatiel is 18. It is good to know someone else with a geriatric 'tiel. :) 15-20 is "average" but 'tiels come with so many diseases from the stores nowadays most never make it past 10. Sad...

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Sat Nov 04, 2006 10:56 pm


Dragnsl, I would like to read some of the scientific evidence you refer to regarding mites coming in on bedding. If you can post references or citations (please don't post copyrighted material verbatim, Lynx will get upset), I'd like to read it.

The guinea pig mite is a microscopic sarcoptid mite. They are members of the arachnid family, and thus may or may not be related to fleas and ticks, but if so, it is very distantly. It is my understanding they cannot live more than 48 hours or so off a host, and the eggs cannot live 'outside' at all.

Unless guinea pigs with mites spent time somehow in bedding you purchased, then you used it in less than 48 hours, there is no way the commonest guinea pig mite can be transmitted through bedding, kiln-dried or not.

Various other parasites? Possible, if purchased in a broken package stored in a dirty warehouse or such, which I doubt you'd knowingly buy, but highly unlikely.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 12:05 am


I think it unlikely too. Mites can be present on a pig for a long time before causing serious problems. A pig that is ill or compromised may have an outbreak. Mites need a host to survive. They are species specific (generally speaking).

Not that it is impossible but it is highly, highly unlikely.

June

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 1:20 am


Oh, he is so cute! He looks like my little Pierre. I hope he continues to improve.

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rshevin

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 8:52 am


He lost about 20g overnight, not outside of the normal weight fluctations but I already made up some CC mushballs with sweet potato for him to try out. I want him to eat on his own as much as possible because he's definately afraid of me right now.

He kept me up all night drinking obsessively out of the water bottle. I'm going to have to try the spring loaded one today. I hope it's just that he hasn't had cool, fresh water in a long time and not that anything else is wrong (diabetes?).

dragnsl

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 11:43 am


First, you are all assuming your pig can only be infested with Trixacarus caviae which is one type of mite which yes, can only live on a host.

However, there are other rodent mites which can infect other animals including people. Unless you are having entomology reports done on the skin scrapings of your pigs, I am assuming they are not all of the caviae variety. There are tens of thousands of different kinds of mites and some of them don't necessarily care who they chomp on. Some do, like the caviae, some don't.

I am assuming that there are lots of rodents running around in the woodpiles where they are making shavings and if they don't kiln dry them before they bag them, there are bugs. I had never had a problem with Nigel once I switched. Now I use kiln dried, but my pigs are on a rotation of ivermec because of the constant influx of new pigs so I don't have mites here.

So yes, you are partially right. But there are more than one type of mites feeding off our pigs.

I do stand corrected, they do not seem to be related to fleas, but are however related to ticks.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mite

http://www.dr-dan.com/sarcopt.htm

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/IG/IG08600.pdf

http://www.acvcsd.org/biting_mites.pdf

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 1:01 pm


When we talk about mites here, we generally refer to the microscopic mites that live under the skin. Fur mites are visible to the naked eye. They need a host to survive, whether they are rat mites, guinea pig mites, or whatever.

It seems far fetched to me that they would be in bedding. A rare circumstance of poor storage and broken bags might result in some but mice don't like wood bedding.
I think you are misleading people.

You said the mites came from wood shavings. I reitterate that this is highly unlikely.

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