New rescue: Underweight Boar

User avatar
rshevin

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 1:03 pm


He hasn't really eaten the critical care today, or pellets, just hay and lots of water. Should I try to handfeed him or give time and nature a little more space?

HollyT
Get on your bike.

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 1:06 pm


If he's eating on his own than no.

User avatar
rshevin

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 4:53 pm


Ok I have all my supplies now, diaper cream, monistat cream, incontinence pads and fleece for the pen in the bedroom. I've decided to go with the diaper cream for urine scald first, before treating a potential fungal infection that he may or may not have. If I don't notice improvement, I have the other treatment right here.

I realized I was being silly keeping him in the petstore cage! I have some extra cubes that I can easily make a pen with. Duh on me.

I'm still worried he isn't eating enough. The only mushballs he really ate were the tiny bits I put in his mouth.

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 6:55 pm


I wouldn't try the spring-loaded water bottle yet. I'm going to assume he hasn't had cool, fresh, clean water in ages and ages and ages. If it were me I'd let him have all he wants (and maybe put a pillow over your head).

You could try making some mushballs with carrot baby food, or try making some pellet stew with carrot baby food added. If he got pellets at all he's gotten junk and will need to warm up to good quality pellets. If they don't like sweet potato, they often like carrot. Canned pumpkin (pumpkin alone, not the pie filling) has a lot of fiber and they sometimes like it mixed in with pellet slurry or CC.

You can always go out and buy some junk pellets and try to gradually switch him over, but that creates its own set of problems. As long as he's eating hay readily, I think I'd not worry about it unless you start seeing weight losses greater than 20 g, or continuing losses.

I think your plan of urine scald first, then fungal is a good one.

Dragnsl, thanks for the links. Interesting information.

User avatar
rshevin

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 7:22 pm


He got his first little taste of veggie tonight, a tiny bit of carrot and green leaf lettuce and he seemed VERY interested. Good piggie! I actually have some pumpkin frozen back that I was planning on thawing if he didn't like the sweet potato. Carrot can be picked up easily too of course. I could actually puree the fresh ones I have in the fridge now that I think about it.

I felt bad about the spring loaded bottle too and never did put it in today. I wouldn't do it when I wasn't home to monitor how well he was using it every few minutes.

He's already learned how to turtle around in the pigloo. I'll give him another weighing tonight.

User avatar
Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 8:46 pm


All the urine scald I've seen (or at least the pics I have), show very red, inflamed skin. I think this is something else. The desitin could help anyway though I'd try some of the other things first instead.

User avatar
rshevin

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 8:53 pm


Since desitin is the solution for urine scald, is it pretty much the same physiologically as diaper rash? Because this looks nothing like diaper rash. That I can guarentee.

I do think it won't hurt for a day or two. It'll at least soothe his little tummy.

User avatar
Mum
I GAVE, dammit!

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 9:09 pm


Sorry, I've been tied up all weekend and missed this thread.

Poor boy - he really is adorable! And, yes, he does remind me of Spot.

First, I personally wouldn't put the diaper rash cream on. If the scurfy skin is from a fungus, I think it could make it worse by keeping the air out of it.

I'd treat for mites, as you're already doing. And - of course - my old standby for unknown skin stuff is to give a lymdyp rinse after a nizoral or Malaseb bath.

You'll judge by his weight whether or not he needs to be forcefed with the critical care. If he loses weight, then he must be handfed. Many of these pigs from bad conditions have had very little hay and get overgrown molars, so keep an eye on his teeth.

HollyT
Get on your bike.

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 9:33 pm


Desitin is just zinc oxide. The mineral has been known to help heal yeast and fungus and other skin problems hard to heal. So regardless of what it is, it won't hurt him. You could even mix the two without an issue.

User avatar
rshevin

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 9:39 pm


See, now I'm torn again. My initial reaction to his belly was instantly "oh this has to be what fungus looks like" but then I got a few reactions saying it looked like urine scald so I backed off. Now there are other people saying yup, fungus. Maybe I should go with my initial gut feeling?

Lymdyp has to come from a vet right? Or is it one of the things you can get online like the ivermection? I got lucky being able to have the ivermectin so quickly. My friend only had a little left but when I told her I needed 1mL total to treat both pigs 3 times, she just laughed and had plenty for that.

Teeth problems are a HUGE fear. I took in a rescue named Washington a few months back. He was thin but doing fair; I could tell he had overgrown molars because he had the slobbers. I brought him on Saturday, teeth were trimmed Tuesday (first day I could get in), Wednesday he was so severely bloated, weak, and seizing that I lost him. It was devasting. I'm petrified of that happening again but at least this guy is chowing down on the hay. That's good, right?

New pig has no symptoms of tooth problems, yet. What are some good ways to keep an eye on the molars? Incisors look fine but that means nothing.

HollyT
Get on your bike.

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 9:49 pm


You're worrying about problems that aren't there. I'm not even sure why teeth were mentioned. The stuff on his belly is no big deal. Try one that you feel he needs. Start with monistat or do a sponge bath of nizoral. If it doesn't clear up within a day or two try another. It's not going to kill him. Lym Dyp is a last resort. That stuff is horrid horrid.

User avatar
rshevin

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 9:54 pm


Holly, I've been worried about teeth since the moment I laid eyes on him. Teeth are always a concern with a rescue, especially an underweight one.

HollyT
Get on your bike.

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 9:59 pm


He's eating, no?

User avatar
rshevin

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 10:20 pm


He's eating hay only, minimal pellets.

HollyT
Get on your bike.

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 11:50 pm


His output is good?

User avatar
rshevin

Post   » Mon Nov 06, 2006 10:13 am


I went ahead and gave him about 20cc of critical care this morning because his weight was still slowly dropping. He didn't fight the syringe feeding so that was good. He wasn't just sucking the stuff down but I expect as much. Luckily I have time to go home for lunch today so he can get a little more and then again late in the day.

His weight increased 20 grams after feeding so I know I got some good stuff into his little tummy. He also ate his little bit of lettuce again this morning so at least he likes veggies.

My biggest concern is that Washington was exactly this way when I got him, eating veggies and hay but no pellets. Assuming things stay status quo for the next few days, I'm going to hold off on the vet and any necessary teeth issues until he puts on some weight with the syringe.

User avatar
Mum
I GAVE, dammit!

Post   » Mon Nov 06, 2006 10:17 am


Assuming things stay status quo for the next few days, I'm going to hold off on the vet and any necessary teeth issues until he puts on some weight with the syringe.
I've always found it very hard to get a pig to gain weight on critical care - usually I can just get them to maintain, although not always that.

I understand your concerns, but it really might be wise to at least rule out teeth issues. Sometimes it can take quite a bit to find out the actual problem, and if you're handfeeding all that time the pig can lose condition.

And, yes, LymDyp is 'horrid' - but it works. However you do indeed have to live with a stinky pig until it wears off!

User avatar
rshevin

Post   » Mon Nov 06, 2006 10:46 am


Ugg, sedation and tooth grinding is obviously scary as heck to me given my past experience. I guess I'll re-evaluate my situation when I go home for lunch and this time make an appointment specifically with the most experienced vet in the practice. He's a rabbit specialist and has the most hallowed reputation I've ever seen from people with every kind of animal you can imagine. All the rescue ladies insist on seeing him for their dogs.

Meh, I have no problem with horrid smelling lymdyp if it works. I might have to move the quarentine cage to the bathroom for that night but I seriously doubt it could smell bad enough to keep me awake.

Oh, you forgot to say, can I get lymdyp online or should I ask the vet for some?

User avatar
Mum
I GAVE, dammit!

Post   » Mon Nov 06, 2006 11:03 am


The vet will probably have it. Or you can order it online anywhere (no prescription needed). I know they have it at Valley Vet and several other places.

http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?PGGUID=30e077be-7b6a-11d5-a192-00b0d0204ae5

User avatar
rshevin

Post   » Mon Nov 06, 2006 11:30 am


Thanks. It sounds darn useful for a rescue person to have on hand.

Post Reply
379 posts