Meg is getting spayed

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Elly

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 12:17 am


I force fed her again (and forced her water as well) and pissed her off royally. So much so that when I put her back in her cage she gave me a "look" (you know the one), marched over to her water bottle to drink, then (I swear) stomped across to the hay and munched a few strands then went to work on her veggies.

She is now lying in the cage looking peaceful if upset (with me). She is no longer puffed up and at this moment my daughter is offering her more lettuce which Meg took from her and is eating.

She came home from surgery at about 1:30pm. There was some bloody discharge on the towel when I changed it. I changed her towel at 8:00pm and when I checked just not at 11:00 I am seeing no new discharge on the new towel.

I will check her incision first thing in the morning to look for any puffiness, heat, odor, pus, etc.

Thank you all for helping me get her through this. I know we aren't out of the woods yet but her appetite seems to be getting better by the minute. I measure her out 2 ounces of pellets and will be weighing them to see if she's eating and refreshing them at least once a day to encourage her to eat.

If her appetite stays good should I worry about getting her stronger pain relief? Right now she is pretty active and moving about the cage seeking out any missed bits of veggie and picking out choice strands of hay. It seems to me she must be feeling better.

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SylvesterPiggie

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 9:14 am


How was it to see your own pet have surgery? I have the option of seeing my cat get neutered. I love watching surgery, but don't know how it will be with my own.

I'm glad she seems to be recovering fine! I should have put that first!

User avatar
Elly

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 10:21 am


I thought it was really cool and my Vet and his Tech let me know that is is a rare thing for him to allow someone into the surgery suite to attend surgeries. haven't been his client for long but he said he felt really comfortable with me and has invited me back any time.

He also told me not to tell anyone else he can spay GPs. He said h will be happy to do any of mine but if he can avoid ever doing another he will be happy. Like I said it is remarkably "fiddly" and complicated. I have no idea what nature was thinking when designing the interior works of the female guinea pig. The uterine horns and fallopian tubes had to be 3-4 inches long--just ridiculous.

If you can handle the blood (not much blood in a neuter) I say you do it. The good thing is, if you feel sick or faint, you can walk out. You are not necessary and they will have no problem with that.

Meg is doing great this morning. She scooted away from my hand when I reached in her cage this. I see no discharge on the towels, she has eaten most of her hay from yesterday and it seem like she nibbled a tad on her pellets as .1 ounce is missing. Not much but it's something.

There are not a lot of poops in her cage though. She may be eating mos of them though because I noticed her eating them off the cage bottom last night. I will be keeping a close eye on her output, both urinary and fecal, to make sure tat food is actually passing through her system.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 11:02 am


I felt funny. My vet let me watch from a window and I came in and took a couple pics of Snowflake when she got her spay but I just felt funny. I had no idea I would (it was not faintness but not realizing how uncomfortable it was seeing your pet being cut up).

A pic of the surgery on this page:

www.guinealynx.info/surgery.html

Glad things are going well though.

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 1:25 pm


I would so absolutely no way even be in the same hallway. You guys have stronger constitutions than me.

To answer your question 'if she's eating, do you need to pursue stronger pain med': in my opinion, no. Meg seems to be made of tough stuff. If you don't need an opiate past 24-36 hours post-surgical, in my experience you won't need it at all.

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SylvesterPiggie

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 2:17 pm


I have seen some surgery. I am not faint, and it is so interesting to me. But, like Lynx, I think I might have a problem, because he is mine. Thanks for the input, I'll check it out, and can always just walk out.

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Elly

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 2:39 pm


Thanks Talishan. She certainly doesn't seem to need pain meds and she is now doing so great that you can hardly tell she had surgery at all. I haven't given her any Meticam today either because she just didn't seem like she needed it. The Vet commented before the surgery when he gave her an injection and she hardly moved for it that she is one tough pig.

Her incision area looks great! It is pink and perfect. No oozing of any kind, no puffiness, no heat. It seems like the perfect example of a surgical healing.

Thank you everyone for the good vibes and well wishes you have sent. I credit your healing powers for making Meg feel so good so fast.

Here are some hearwarming pictures of Daisy and Meg from last night.

"Meg! MEG! Where are you? Why are you in there?
Image

"Don't worry. I'll bust you out of there"
Image

"I'm sorry Meg. I'm not strong enough. I'll stay nearby though and give you get-well kisses through the bars"
Image

You can see in Meg's eyes in the last 2 pictures that she is not feeling well and is probably in pain. It was heartwrenching for me yesterday wanting to make her feel better and not being able to do much more then comfort her. I may be able to sit though surgery and deal with horrific injuries in my animals and in the rescues I do but I cannot stand suffering of any kind.

Tracis
Let Sleeping Pigs Lie

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 3:04 pm


I'm so glad that Meg is healing well.

Daisy and Meg are very sweet together (well, almost together). :)

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 3:37 pm


Love your pics. Heart warming. Look out for files.

If you have not had surgical incisions on pigs, you might want to look over the ones linked to on the surgery page. There was a time when I though Snowflake was coming apart but it was actually normal granulation (I have pics -- always contact your vet if you are concerned).

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 4:43 pm


You're right at about 24 hours right now, correct? The next 12-24 may be her worst. It's then easier from there.

With any luck she and you will not even experience that, and she'll be fine. Please keep us posted. How's she drinking?

User avatar
Elly

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 5:28 pm


I haven't seen her drink today so that is a good question. I have just marked her water bottle so I can see if the level drops.

I noticed her lying under her towel for a long while so I gave her a lettuce leaf, which she ate, and she is now out from under the towel munching on hay.

I will start wetting her veggies to help insure she is taking in water and I have a sub que kit if I need it.

She still looks real good, moves easily and just now I saw her pee. In fact, she is drinking from her bottle right now. It seems like, whenever I sit down to give an update, she starts doing whatever is being questioned and she's easy to watch as I type because the cages are only 3 feet from my computer.

I called the vet to let them know how she is doing and they laughed and said they were just looking up my number to call me because they were all so concerned and curious. The vet is thrilled she is doing so well.

User avatar
Elly

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 5:40 pm


WARNING GRAPHIC PHOTO



Here is a picture from her surgery. The vet is closing and you can see the removed uterus and one ovary.
The cyst on it ruptured while he was removing it (it squirted all over me).

Image

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 5:43 pm


She saw you type "sub que kit" and decided to take a drink.

Holding my breath and sending good vibes for especially the next 12-18 hours or so. Then I think she's well on her way.

Edit: great photo. I would have passed clean out. I give you guys credit, those who attend and those who actually perform and assist.

User avatar
Elly

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 5:57 pm


Then you do not want to see the video clip I got when they first opened her up. While exploring for the ovary Meg gave a reflexive kick (they stopped and dropped her deeper at that point just to be sure). When she kicked half of her intestines popped out and the Vet had to get them back in again. I think most people would have run screaming from the room at that point (or passed out) and I would not have blamed them a bit.

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 6:16 pm


*thud*

Poor Meg. I'm so glad she's doing so well so far.

User avatar
Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 7:49 pm


With the intestines popping out, I'm thinking the vet would not feel this was a useful "learning" video to put online.

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salana
GL is Just Peachy

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 8:22 pm


Yes, let's not see the intestines.

Gut-free surgery photos would be cool though.

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Elly

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 10:13 pm


Yeah, I figured the one with the intestines coming out would not be good but I have another where he located the ovary and was trying to figure out how to best detach it from the body wall. Everything stayed where it should be in that video.

I still don't think it would be too terribly educational though. It was such a small incision and everything is so jumbled together. I may be able to grab some useful stills from it though but I will have to go through it frame by frame to see.

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snowflakey
E's Moriarity

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 10:48 pm


Daisy is such a cutie-pie. I hope Meg is continuing to feel well. Abdominal surgery is really traumatic.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Mar 29, 2007 11:05 pm


Elly, I did find it very difficult to make useful sense of the handful of pics I took of Snowflake. I think it helps to have a vet who has in the back of his mind, illustrating various actions and then using pics showing these actions.

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