Subcue questions

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Wed May 23, 2007 9:03 pm


What I would really like to do is to be able to videotape someone doing subcues. I think it would be very helpful to people. Wonder if I can find anyone in Virginia who can do it..

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sef1268

Post   » Wed May 23, 2007 9:24 pm


YES! That would be fantastic. It could show how to tell if a pig is dehydrated; how to rig up the butterfly catheter; how to warm up the solution; how to pull up the skin with two fingers and find that elusive "tent" that they all talk about; some of the things that can go wrong (might want to use a stuffed animal for that part); etc.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Wed May 23, 2007 9:32 pm


I DO have a stuffed animal. Actually, that's all I have right now. Not sure it would work for what I have in mind.

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Wed May 23, 2007 10:17 pm


Would CaveSpringPiggie consider it? We could have an auction to pay her something for it.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Wed May 23, 2007 10:19 pm


She is precisely the person I was thinking of. No idea if she would be willing to do so but now I have a camera that can take closeup movies and would love to start putting together some crucial videos (some things are best viewed in motion, not with simple pics). I think I can add sound later (too hard to do it all at once).

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sef1268

Post   » Thu May 24, 2007 1:26 pm


Is there a reason why a needle marked 1" would be longer than another needle (from another manufacturer) marked 1"? Only difference is that one is a 20 gauge, and the other is a 22. The 20 gauge is shorter, for some strange reason.

?

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Thu May 24, 2007 7:30 pm


I'm gonna take a truly WAG and say that one measures from the tip of the needle to the base, while the other measures from the tip of the needle opening (down on the slant) to the base.

Real WAG there.

pinta

Post   » Fri May 25, 2007 1:45 am


I shake the syringe with fluid after warming to make sure there are no hot spots or cold spots.

Too warm fluid causes them to go ballistic as well as too cool fluid. It should be body temperature and tested the same way you test the temp of a baby's bottle - inner wrist.

You may have hit a nerve or the needle may have been jabbing the skin from the inside.

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sef1268

Post   » Fri May 25, 2007 9:39 am


Thank you, Pinta. I think I did two things wrong -- warmed the solution too much (although it felt fine on my wrist, going "ballistic" is exactly what happened), and possibly also hit a nerve. I'm sticking with the thigh area from now on.

pinta

Post   » Fri May 25, 2007 4:01 pm


There is more loose skin at the scruff of the neck. If you are doing daily subcues keep moving the injection site around to avoid scar tissue build-up.

chii
I Love Lucy

Post   » Fri May 25, 2007 4:03 pm


I definitely prefer butterflies. I find that the longer needles are much more difficult to use on pigs (much easier to go in one side and out the other), not to mention that it gives you no leeway if the pig starts moving.

To help reduce leakage, I always try to pinch the skin where the needle is at when I'm pulling the needle out or after I pull it out (depending on what the pig will let me do). It does help reduce the amount of leaking/bleeding, but I'll warn you now that pigs HATE being pinched, even the slightest little bit. I usually get more protesting screeches then than at any other point during the subq. Pulling up the skin to insert the needle is the runner-up.

Be super careful that you don't get your fluids too warm. Always squirt a little on your hand or arm to test before injecting. Cold fluids don't feel good, but too hot fluids would probably be like torture and likely cause tissue damage. Always err on the side of caution.

Also, ditto on what Josephine said about using a new needle for everything. Guinea pigs have very tough skin compared to other animals, so the sharper the needle, the better. Even just sticking it into the fluid bag to draw up the fluids dulls it a little IMO.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Fri May 25, 2007 7:53 pm


Always squirt a little on your hand or arm to test before injecting.

The inside of the arm (or wrist) is a good test point. Hands are very tolerant of heat and cannot judge temps as accurately.

If you've raised kids, you know to use the tender inside of your arm and never trust the hand for checking bath temps. I never used baby bottles but one always sprinkled some milk on the inside of the arm to ensure it was not too hot.

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sef1268

Post   » Fri May 25, 2007 8:19 pm


I have managed to jab myself twice with these longer needles as I tried to guide them into the pinched spot, so I think I'll pick up some 3/4" 22-gauge needles tomorrow. I just seem to have a lot of trouble SEEING what I'm doing. Maybe it's because I need bifocals, or maybe because he is an Abby with dark hair and dark skin, but I just can't see where it's going in.

Yes, I do use a new needle each time, and at the vet tech's suggestion, I leave one needle in the bag that is used for drawing up the fluid -- then put a new needle on the syringe for giving the subcue.

Today's session went a whole lot better. I didn't warm the solution for very long at all (ran it for just a few seconds under the hot water faucet, turning it constantly...I thought it just felt tepid, but Sebastian seemed more a lot comfortable with it), and it went quickly. How do you know if you have the right temperature or not? Guinea pigs having a higher body temperature than we do, I guess I just assumed it needed to be pretty warm.

I really hate that I hurt Sebastian the other day. I had squirted the warmed solution on the inside of my arm and thought it felt nicely warm without being too hot, but he had an absolute fit with it, and then had those "hiccups" afterwards (God, that was quite a morning).

Well, with any luck at all, maybe he'll start drinking on his own again after the Prednisone has a chance to kick in. Hope so.

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salana
GL is Just Peachy

Post   » Fri May 25, 2007 8:22 pm


I found 1" needles easier to use than shorter 5/8", actually. I felt like I had trouble getting the 5/8" through the hair to the skin with confidence.

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Fri May 25, 2007 8:29 pm


In our experience they drink better (?!) while well-hydrated with subcutaneous fluids. Makes no sense, but I'll take them drinking well any day.

Best to Sebastian and to you.

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