Guinea pig swallowed syringe stopper/plug!!

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Mum
I GAVE, dammit!

Post   » Fri Aug 17, 2007 11:59 pm


maremma, you did not offend me. I'm just concerned that you've now offered this advice several times here in the medical forum.

We try to keep the advice on this forum accurate and based on research or known fact!

I've indeed used mineral oil for some time to clean anal sacs - sometimes it really helps to make the sac more lubricated. I've also used it to extrude stuck penises.

On the rare occasion that I've given ivermectin orally, I've mixed it with vegetable oil.

Katrina16

Post   » Sat Aug 18, 2007 7:36 am


Thank you all for the replies.

She is peeing and pooping normally, and totally acting herself so I think it hasn't got stuck in her.

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sef1268

Post   » Sat Aug 18, 2007 10:19 am


That's very good news, Katrina16!

Mum -- do you think castor oil would be a possible alternative to the use of mineral oil? Is the issue of rancidity (is that even a word?) the reason why veg-based oils aren't ideal for anal sac cleaning?

I have to admit...the more I think about mineral oil and its chemical make-up, the less I like the idea of using it for much of anything.

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Mum
I GAVE, dammit!

Post   » Sat Aug 18, 2007 11:06 am


do you think castor oil would be a possible alternative to the use of mineral oil?
I haven't heard of that for years - isn't that what people used to take for constipation? :-p

Really, I don't know. Josephine would be the best person to answer this I think.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Sat Aug 18, 2007 11:07 pm


I think vegetable oil could be used to clean the anal sack. There is regular movement, it wouldn't sit around. For oils to get sticky, they have to be exposed to air for a while (in my experience).

HollyT
Get on your bike.

Post   » Sun Aug 19, 2007 12:55 am


Perhaps some lactulose would help if necessary.

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rshevin

Post   » Sun Aug 19, 2007 1:04 am


Inside the tiny air sacks of the lungs (aveoli) a substance called a surfactant which serves to decrease the surface tension of water in the aveoli and thus increase gas exchange and also prevent aveolar collapse. Surfactants are also commonly included in soaps. Surfactants and oils interact in ways which are functionally fatal to both substances. I assume any oil which is aspirated would cause the same risk of aveolar death and associated lung damage.

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