Ate some thread.

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rshevin

Post   » Mon Feb 25, 2008 11:26 pm


It's possible the dish flipping did it. Bar bitting can as well. I'd switch him to a secured or plastic dish ASAP.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Tue Feb 26, 2008 8:02 am


Read gl/teeth_broken.html

Weigh daily. Watch closely to see if the top teeth start to be worn down. If you do see a vet to have the top teeth trimmed, MAKE SURE IT IS ONLY A TINY AMOUNT! Many vets cut off too much worsening the problem.

Once you can see the regrowing bottom teeth, the gradual wearing of the top teeth should begin again. Weighing daily will let you know if there is a problem that must be addressed immediately (also, observe closely).

Tandy

Post   » Tue Feb 26, 2008 10:19 am


Lynx - thanks for the reminder. I had read that page in the past but had forgotten about it.

From the page
... Too often people (and some vets) get obsessed with the length of the front teeth confusing individuality with overgrowth and attempting to force the teeth to lengths inappropriate for that particular pig. Rule-of-thumb: If the pig is not losing weight - there most likely is not a problem.
His top incisors are starting to curve in a little. I will keep a close watch - so far he is doing just fine. I think with pigs it is good to be a little obsessive (in watching them).

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tine

Post   » Tue Feb 26, 2008 10:33 am


Dear Tandy,

It often happens in Lab (i dealt with hundred of experimental SD rats before), that they fight with each other and cause broken teeth. Just looking like yours, of course your pig might be just an accident of example biting on the cage to hard.

As we dont check their teeth very often and it would be noticed when we found it was dropping weight obviously. Because the upper front teeth is growing too long and damaging the lower gum, also stopping the lower incisors growing out.

What i would do was to use a completely disinfected nail clipper ad clip the front teeth short, and also wet the pellet so it could eat better. It helps.

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rshevin

Post   » Tue Feb 26, 2008 11:19 am


Tine, are you NUTS! Good heavens don't EVER do that to an animal. Nail clippers are for nails. DO NOT EVER attempt to do anything to an animals teeth with nail trimmers.

Everyone, please, do no follow this dangerous advice.

Tandy

Post   » Tue Feb 26, 2008 2:36 pm


Plastic dish.... check
Weight good .... check
Still doing a couple of syringe feedings a day. I am noticing the side to side grind of his jaw when he is just sittin and chillin. Is that the front teeth or the molars that he is working on?

p.s. here is the family. Image

Deuce is my problem boy 4yo.... Nutmeg 2 yo (I should call her Fatmeg) is on the ramp and baby Kneesaa, we are thinking 3-4 mo's any one else have a guesstimate on her age? She is a Teddy.

And yet another question and maybe I should post this in the chat section - Nutmeg snarfs her food and is a little on the rubenesque side while the others are able to control their appetites and not get so chunky. Does anyone have problems controlling the weight of just one pig in a herd? And what do you do?

klynne

Post   » Tue Feb 26, 2008 4:29 pm


"What i would do was to use a completely disinfected nail clipper ad clip the front teeth short"

Tine, this site does not endorse do-it-yourself dental work on gps. Better to have a competent cavy vet do a very small trim, if needed.

Tandy, if it has been at least two weeks since those incisors were broken off, there may be another problem. GP teeth grow amazingly fast, and I'd want to see a normal or near normal length to them again after that amount of time.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Tue Feb 26, 2008 6:02 pm


Tine, read the broken teeth page (follow link above). A big problem is chopping the teeth too short so the guinea pig can't even pick up the food to eat.

Ditto on not clipping the teeth short. That is one lousy idea.

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tine

Post   » Wed Feb 27, 2008 3:35 am


well guys i am sorry that my "lousy"advice triggered your anger. Of course cutting the teeth short would cause a big problem, but i was talking talking about cutting it short a bit so "it would not hurt the lower gum", someone sensible would certainly be able to judge to what length is alright to a rodent.

Of course it is the best to let a GP vet handle it. And also let the vet check the molars.

But in my own experienced hands it is okay for me to do so. Okay other owners: please leave the work to vets.

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Cavespringpiggie

Post   » Wed Feb 27, 2008 6:05 am


Tine and everyone, I think we have to be very careful what advice we give on a medical forum. I have heard of people suing others because of poor medical advice given on a forum. I work at a vet hospital and I am very careful about what I tell the average pet owner to do. We never use toe nail trimmers to do teeth on rodents or rabbits. They make tools especially for teeth that not only work better but they also do LESS harm.

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Mum
I GAVE, dammit!

Post   » Wed Feb 27, 2008 9:56 am


It's possible to split the tooth by using the wrong instrument to clip it. If the tooth splits down below the gumline there'll be a serious problem.

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amy m guinea

Post   » Wed Feb 27, 2008 8:44 pm


Mum, I don't want to highjack this thread at all, but what does happen when the tooth splits below the gumline? Will it never grow back right? Would you recommend trimming the one tooth short so it has a chance to grow back correctly?

Thanks, this has been coming up in my mind lately.

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Mum
I GAVE, dammit!

Post   » Wed Feb 27, 2008 8:49 pm


If it splits below the gumline it may be permanently injured.

I'd leave his teeth alone as long as he's eating properly. Generally, once they hit the top incisors they start to be worn down correctly.

If you trimmed the remaining incisor, then you'd be handfeeding until the teeth were long enough.

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amy m guinea

Post   » Wed Feb 27, 2008 8:51 pm


Would it probably just grow out with a crack in it forever? This may not be a problem if the pig is eating and weighing the same I guess. I worry that eventually it could split up above the gumline and cause tissue injury or an abscess.

Thank you!

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Mum
I GAVE, dammit!

Post   » Wed Feb 27, 2008 8:56 pm


Would it probably just grow out with a crack in it forever?
This is where you can end up with an 'extra' tooth. It often grows at a strange angle. Infection is not uncommon.

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amy m guinea

Post   » Wed Feb 27, 2008 9:09 pm


Thank you.

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