Inguinal Hernia -- prognosis/complications

Post Reply
Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Sun Jan 08, 2012 2:36 am


"They stopped icing him a couple hours ago, and the fever has gone down on its own to 100."

Cautious woo. I'll sleep better tonight.

Josephine
Little Jo Wheek

Post   » Sun Jan 08, 2012 3:29 pm


No, from what you describe, inguinal is inguinal. So the swelling in the scrotal area would be an inguinal hernia. My issue is that the inguinal region is NOT sutured shut after an abdominal neuter. It doesn't need to be. However, with a scrotal neuter, if they don't, it's pretty dangerous.

Not sure if all of the literature and CE stuff is encouraging the abdominal neuters or what. I still think they are pretty uncommon, but I do believe it is the much safer route to go. Just a tad unnerved about the infection.

Charybdis

Post   » Sun Jan 08, 2012 5:13 pm


His temp was back up to 102 today so they decided not to release him just yet.

I find the massive infection odd too. This foster is very diligent about checking the incision site and changing the bedding twice daily. The vet did not give her antibiotics so she used 7 days of Baytril that she had on hand, then ran out. It was two days later that the swelling showed up.

This is a young, healthy boar born in our rescue. He should have been able to sail through this given the excellent care he was getting.

Josephine
Little Jo Wheek

Post   » Sun Jan 08, 2012 5:38 pm


I wish I knew both sides of it, yanno? I mean, why are cavies so susceptible to post surgical abscesses? I've had tons sail through without incident, but one neuter and it went horribly bad.

C Cole-Chakotay

Post   » Sun Jan 08, 2012 5:48 pm


I'm hoping the best for the little one.

User avatar
JudiL-MetroGPRescue
Poop Obsessed

Post   » Sun Jan 08, 2012 7:23 pm


Ah, I didn't know you didn't need to suture the inguinal ring after the abdominal neuter. I've never seen one, so I don't know the technique, but one of the local exotic vets does do it that way. He does it to reduce chance of infection. My vet does scrotal neuters and I can't remember the last time a guinea pig had an infection. OTOH, we have had a number of guinea pigs have problems after their abdominal neuters, mostly from suture reactions or abscesses. I don't get it. It is so much more invasive.

I hope this little guy gets better soon.

Josephine
Little Jo Wheek

Post   » Sun Jan 08, 2012 7:33 pm


Wondering if most of the post surgical issues AREN'T stemming from suture reactions, actually.

Well, there is not a huge issue of prolapse and death after the abdominal neuters. I think that issue has been hashed and rehashed enough, though.

Charybdis

Post   » Sun Jan 08, 2012 9:43 pm


Fever is down and they are releasing him with two drains in the scrotum.

Josephine
Little Jo Wheek

Post   » Sun Jan 08, 2012 9:48 pm


That is good news. Thanks for the update.

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Mon Jan 09, 2012 2:56 am


Ditto. Please keep us posted.

User avatar
JudiL-MetroGPRescue
Poop Obsessed

Post   » Tue Jan 10, 2012 6:31 pm


What's the latest and greatest, Chary?

Charybdis

Post   » Tue Jan 10, 2012 7:15 pm


He went home with the foster and his temp has remained stable. However, he managed to tear one of his shunts so he went back that night. I asked the foster to request Torb instead of the Tramadol because I have had success with Torb on pigs who are stitch-rippers. The vet did not want to give Metacam and Torb together. She wanted to use an e-collar instead. After much insisting that it was safe, she consented to replace the Tramadol with Torb. I haven't heard of any more fussing with the shunts. The foster says he is eating, she is monitoring his temperature and applying a warm compress several times a day.

They told her she didn't need to flush around the shunts. I thought this was odd since I have always flushed them.

Josephine
Little Jo Wheek

Post   » Tue Jan 10, 2012 7:32 pm


Well, most people cannot accomplish simple flushing, so some vets don't recommend it. Plus, all of the studies are showing how damaging and counter-productive it is to flush with anything other than isotonic fluids (and if fluid remains, it can actually cause issues, too). And your typical cat abscess doesn't need it at all.

Really weird that the vet refused butorphanol and Metacam together. Wonder which pain camp she's in and if she would do it for another animal... Maybe she just doesn't send torb home? Since tramadol came on the scene, that is much more convenient and less sedating.

I am, however, very pleased to hear this update. I was quite worried when you originally posted his story.

User avatar
JudiL-MetroGPRescue
Poop Obsessed

Post   » Tue Jan 10, 2012 10:19 pm


This is great news!

Charybdis

Post   » Tue Jan 10, 2012 11:27 pm


Ok, this from the foster:

Of course, Simon has a terrible smell - the infection, I guess. But when I take the thermometer out of him, the smell is outrageous. And there's a gooey substance. Is that the right place for the smell to be coming out of? And is that gooey-clear substance right? I thought maybe it was whatever they were putting on the thermometer when they took his temp stuck in there, so I tried to clean him out a bit with a q-tip, but he seems very painful down there so I didn't really pursue it.

Is this smell just from pus from the abscess leaking into the anal sac?

Josephine
Little Jo Wheek

Post   » Wed Jan 11, 2012 12:09 am


Could be. Who knows? He shouldn't be leaking lots of pus from there with drains in, though.

User avatar
Amy0204
We miss our sweet Oreo

Post   » Wed Jan 11, 2012 12:32 am


Could he be impacted as a result of all of his problems? The stuff that comes out of an impacted boar's rectum smells absolutely vile in those cases.

Charybdis

Post   » Wed Jan 11, 2012 12:50 am


I will suggest that to the foster. I hate being so far away so I can't just go over there and look.

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Wed Jan 11, 2012 1:14 am


"Really weird that the vet refused butorphanol and Metacam together."

Big ditto to this (although otherwise it sounds like LBAH is doing absolutely everything else right as usual). In this case I would think you'd actually *want* the slightly stronger sedating effect of butorphanol.

In my experience it's shorter-acting, but more zonking. That is, pig sleeps, pig rests, pig is not in pain but wakes up ravenous (think munchies ;-). For the cases we've had where we needed just that, it was perfect.

Gooey-clear doesn't make me think pus. Could it simply be lymphatic fluid/plasma (Josephine, whatever the clear discharge you normally get is, please tell me the right word) that you almost always get, with an odor due to the infection present/necrotic tissue nearby/crudded up in there due to location (along with some of what Amy mentions)?

Charybdis

Post   » Thu Jan 12, 2012 5:19 am


Simon is at the ER vet in Garden Grove about to undergo another surgery. He ripped out one of his shunts today and a vet at LBAH saw him and added an antibiotic but didn't do anything to the incision area. Since then it has started to spread horizontally and has met the second drain hole to form a gaping wound in his abdomen. Between the holes is a lot of necrotic tissue which the vet feels needs to be removed. The vet on duty is not an exotics vet but he has worked with Dr. R before. He sounded confident and I checked to make sure he is using only Isofluorane and no pre-anesthetic injectables.

Dr. R is not in tomorrow and at the rate it is spreading we do not want to take our chances on finding another vet tomorrow who can do the surgery. I am really concerned about having a non-exotics vet do this but it seems we are out of choices.

Post Reply
146 posts