Abbey's Medical Thread

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Delaine
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Post   » Sat Nov 07, 2015 11:55 pm


Thanks Lynx. I will try and get a picture of her front teeth to post. I would like an opinion on whether or not they look like a normal length.

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Delaine
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Post   » Thu Nov 19, 2015 9:39 pm


Abbey's vet appointment is tomorrow. Besides the dropping of pellets, which seems to be better I believe she is developing pea eye. I have noticed a drooping of the lower lid on one eye and when I pulled the lid down last night there may be a small lump. Some days it looks almost normal and other days it is more pronounced.

I will discuss these issues with her vet and I will also bring up heart issues. I feel she took too long coming out of the anesthetic when she had her sebaceous cyst surgery. Also there was one time when she was in a deep sleep and it took several prompts to wake her up. Now possibly pea eye. She also has the tear duct problem on the other eye.

Any other questions I should ask the vet tomorrow?

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Lynx
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Post   » Thu Nov 19, 2015 11:16 pm


Sounds like you have it covered. The tear duct problem, does it get blocked? Have you tried a warm, wet compress to loosen things up?

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Delaine
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Post   » Thu Nov 19, 2015 11:27 pm


Lynx: I have tried warm, wet compresses in the past. I am not even sure it is a tear duct problem. She has had this issue for over two years. Her eye fills with cleaning fluid when she grooms but it doesn't drain away properly and can run down her face. It only happens when she washes her face. Passing her front paws across her face and eyes triggers the release of cleaning fluid.

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Lynx
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Post   » Fri Nov 20, 2015 7:42 am


It does sound like the lower duct to collect and recirculate the fluid may be blocked. If her eyes are not suffering from dryness, that is a good thing.

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Delaine
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Post   » Fri Nov 20, 2015 2:12 pm


I love my vet. She is so open to any information I have learned here and bring to discuss with her. She had not heard of the possible relationship between a compromised heart and pea eye but said it could make sense.

She said she sees bulging eyes in rabbits with heart issues. It makes sense that a rise in blood pressure could cause an increase in pressure in the eyes. Maybe that is why some members have seen an improvement using Lasix. Lasix being a diuretic would remove excess fluid which in turn could lower blood pressure.

She also mentioned that blood pressure changes daily and even throughout the day depending on food eaten, temperature, movement, etc. Maybe that is why some days Abbey's eye looks almost normal and other days the small pea eye is more noticeable. Maybe it comes down to blood pressure???

Anyways, Abbey's eye was good today and the pea eye was hardly visible but her vet feels it could be just starting. She checked her teeth. Abbey wasn't cooperating so she didn't get the best look. She seems to be eating her pellets without too much trouble and she is eating everything else. She watched her chew and she felt the chewing motion was normal so for now I am going to monitor her. Her weight is consistent.

She checked her heart. It was steady and she heard no abnormalities so for now I will monitor her.

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Sun Nov 22, 2015 9:34 pm


Heart heart heart heart heart!!!!!

What did the vet do to 'check'?

See if you can get a trial of benazepril based on clinical sign.

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Delaine
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Post   » Sun Nov 22, 2015 10:22 pm


Other than the eye issues Abbey is full of energy, eating well, digestive system great. She is by no means lethargic or showing any other signs of heart issues. She is a healthy weight.

Her vet listened to her heart. She could hear no abnormalities. I am not sure there are enough signs indicating heart issues at this time.

If I do try benazepril what improvements would I see? Would the pea eye disappear?

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Delaine
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Post   » Sat Sep 24, 2016 5:28 pm


During cuddle time this week I noticed Abbey's right eye is starting to get cloudy. It started out very subtle and I had to have her out under certain lighting to even see the changes. It is gradually getting more obvious but still not noticeable when she is in her cage.

Abbey is 5 1/2 years and because of the gradual onset I am thinking cataracts rather than injury. This eye does have pea eye but is otherwise normal. There is no redness or damage that I can see.

When I had her in for a checkup back in March 2015 her vet said she noticed cataracts starting to form when she examined her eye.

Abbey hasn't been to her vet since November 2015 so I made an appointment for Friday September 30th.

My friend's pig has cataracts and they monitor the pressure of her eye. In humans I was not aware cataracts caused the pressure to build. I thought is was glaucoma that was the problem. Can cataracts cause pressure to build in the eye?

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Lynx
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Post   » Sat Sep 24, 2016 7:51 pm


I was not aware of that potential issue either. I do not know the answer to your question but do know that guinea pigs with cataracts manage fine with impaired vision.

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Delaine
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Post   » Sat Mar 25, 2017 12:23 pm


Not sure what to do. I had Abbey to her vet yesterday for a checkup. Upon examination her vet felt cysts on both ovaries. One is about the size of a marble and the other one smaller.

I took her in because I was concerned about ovarian cysts. Her heat cycles are lasting longer (about three days) and she is out of sorts during that time and rumbles around her sister. She doesn't come out of her house as much during her cycle and her appetite is down a little for the three days which makes me wonder if she was in pain. Afterwards she is back to normal. She has no other symptoms such as crusty nipples or hair loss.

I hesitate to have her spayed because she turns 6 years old tomorrow. Both eyes are solid white with cataracts and she has been gradually losing some weight over the year which seems to be common in senior pigs. She has lost 30 grams since September 2016. She was 1165 grams at the vet yesterday. She had some trouble after her last surgery and it took 36 hours to get her back legs working and under her.

I have another appointment in a month to check on the size of the cysts. If they have grown I will need to make a decision. I hate to put her through surgery only to lose her during or after but can't let her suffer with the pain of growing cysts. I am going to give her Metacam during her heat cycles to help with any discomfort.

I am wondering if hormone therapy might be an option for her.

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Lynx
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Post   » Sat Mar 25, 2017 2:46 pm


I understand why you might not want to opt for surgery.

bpatters
And got the T-shirt

Post   » Sat Mar 25, 2017 5:36 pm


There are hormone treatments for ovarian cysts. They're not the cure-all that surgery is, but they often are effective for many months, and may be a good option for an older pig.

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Delaine
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Post   » Sat Mar 25, 2017 6:19 pm


Thanks Lynx and bpatters. According to the threads there seems to be three choices vets use. My vet hasn't used hormone therapy so I would like to compile some information for her. The choices seem to be HCG, Cystorelin and Lupron. Are all three supposed to shrink the cysts?

In general do ovarian cysts grow quickly or do some grow more slowly? Abbey's vet said she would support me either way regarding the spay. She will do the surgery if I want but she is a little nervous because of her age. I am concerned because Abbey does have some eye issues which according to some members have been linked to heart problems. Should I get an X-ray of her heart?

Abbey is a little more withdrawn since she has become blind due to her cataracts. I am not sure if she has lost her hearing also. Her vet checked her ears and everything looks normal but Abbey no longer responds to my verbal cues. She also wheeks extremely loud as if she can't hear herself. She was always a quiet wheeker. I have to put food in front of her face to get her attention or tap her to show her where I am. Sometimes when she is sleeping and I put food in front of her it takes a few seconds for her to register it is food before she grabs it. During floor time she likes to eat her supper on my lap. I have to guide her with food so she knows where I am sitting and then she jumps up. When it is time to go back to her cage she runs around in all directions until I put the transfer box right in front of her. Then she goes in.

She still eats well and seems to know her schedule. She is always out and eager to eat at the usual times.

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Lynx
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Post   » Sat Mar 25, 2017 8:17 pm


I think your idea of shots is better. You could also watch carefully to see if things change - monitor the size of the cysts especially.

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Delaine
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Post   » Sun Apr 02, 2017 7:40 pm


I have been doing research so I can be as informed as possible when I meet with Abbey's vet on Friday. I have come up with some interesting information. From what I have read it depends on the type of cyst present whether or not hormone therapy will work. According to what I have read only Follicular cysts will respond to hormone therapy. If a pig is showing hair loss and crusty nipples then Follicular cysts would be most likely. If there is no hair loss, etc. then it may be a Serous (cystic rete ovarii) which according to the information is the most common and won't be helped by hormone therapy. Guinea pigs can get Parovarian cysts but they are rare.

Some information came from "Clinical Veterinary Advisor, Bird and Exotic Pets, by Jorg Mayer and Thomas M. Donnelly (starting on Page 270). I was only able to locate the ovarian pages on my tablet but I am not sure how to copy a link on it. Wasn't able to find these pages on my lap top.

I found further information "Ovarian Cysts in the Guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) by Andrew D. Bean, DVM (Pages 757 - 763). There is a table on Page 763 titled "Table 1 - Comparison of historical findings and clinical signs associated with rete cysts versus follicular cysts". This shows symptoms and which type of cyst is most likely.

Here is the link. I hope it worked:

https://books.google.ca/books?id=2PoxAgAAQBAJ&pg=PA763&lpg=P ... ysts&f=false

In Abbey's case she has no hair loss or crusty nipples which might indicate a Rete cyst (Serous cyst). If this is the case hormone therapy wouldn't work.

Any discussion and input on this information would be appreciated.

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Delaine
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Post   » Sun Apr 02, 2017 7:49 pm


Lynx: Thanks for letting me move the above to the correct thread. When I click on the link page 763 comes up. I was hoping it would work because this page has Table l comparing the symptoms of rete cysts follicular cysts.

Here is a link describing the three types of ovarian cysts in guinea pigs.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11913549

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Lynx
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Post   » Sun Apr 02, 2017 8:59 pm


Delaine, I was successful this time. Looks like I need to do a review of the ovarian cysts page here with an update!

And I wrote on the other thread:

p.s I will read this more closely later but I thought follicular cysts were epidermal cysts! I have found plenty only referencing follicular cysts and the ovaries though, more than for skin issues.

Here's one for skin issues:

Epidermal Inclusion Cyst (Follicular Cyst)
http://missinglink.ucsf.edu/lm/dermatologyglossary/epidermal_inclusion_cyst.html

I found on google books I guess something from Select Topics in Dermatology
edited by Peter G. Fisher.
Follicular Cysts
Follicular cysts are less commonly reported in guinea pigs, and reports on prevalence vary widely. One researcher noted that, "In studying a great many (gps) ovaries for cystic conditions during several years, we have never observed a follicular cyst." (citation 30) A study of 85 Hartley sows showed a follicular cyst prevalence of 22.4% when cyst diameter was greater than 0.5 mm. Follicular cysts were most commonly seen during the first half of the estrous cycle. (cytation 40). Beregi and colleagues (citation 41) ultrasonographically verified the presence of ovarian cysts in 10 guinea pigs; histopathology later identified 100% of these cysts as follicular. The true prevalence of follicular cysts in guinea pigs remains unknown.

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Lynx
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Post   » Sun Apr 02, 2017 9:14 pm


Ah, and the PubMed abstract notes that the article is free. There is a 7 page pdf here:

https://wwww.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11913549/S ... _bioactivity_

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Delaine
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Post   » Sun Apr 02, 2017 10:59 pm


I am going to attempt to send this other link. I can bring it up on my tablet but not on my laptop. I sent it to my sister and she was able to access it. I use Firefox and she was using Google Chrome so that may be the difference. I hope it works. This information is from "Clinical Veterinary Advisor, Birds and Exotic Pets" by Jorg Mayer and Thomas M. Donnelly. If it works you are looking for Page 269 and 270 on Ovarian Cysts. It also talks about treatment options.

https://books.google.ca/books?id=Ksyx3o5KsNIC&pg=PA270&lpg=P ... rapy&f=false

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