Zoe's Medical Thread

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Delaine
Supporter in '14

Post   » Sat Feb 20, 2016 2:52 pm


I have made an appointment for Zoe to see her vet next week. Both my girls have always had red feet but I think the redness in one of Zoe's back feet is going to the next level and I am afraid she may be developing Pododermatitis.

I think the cause may be the fact she spends most of her day hogging the hay pile. It is second cut hay which is a good combination of stem and leaf but I don't think walking around on the stems is much better than being houses on wire.

For the first time in five years I have changed from a pile of hay to a hay rack. The rest of the cage is fleece so I am hoping by keeping her from walking back and forth on the rough stems things will improve.

I printed off the pages on Pododermatitis so I can read the information several times. I will also take the information to my vet when I go.

I started applying coconut oil to her back feet and if I don't see an improvement in a day or two I will start the Epsom Salt soaks.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

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Jaycey
Supporter in 2014

Post   » Sat Feb 20, 2016 3:53 pm


I think they're usually okay with just ointments unless they start getting blisters or scabs on their feet. Epsom salts are very drying so I personally wouldn't start bathing them until they got worse, or on instruction from a good vet.

It might be worth giving the feet a quick wash and dry before putting the cream on so any pee is washed off.

I have a pig whose feet are starting to redden from hanging out in the hay. I admit to being a bit lax and not cleaning it fully each day, simply because my hay costs would rocket. So, he has a hay rack (well it's a bag) so he has access to fresh hay all the time. He likes to lay in his hay too, so he now has a really small hay box for lounging in and I dump that out each day. It's about 1/4 size of his last hay area so it's not as costly.

If the vet does think it's the start of bumblefoot it's a good idea to get some vet bed, of you don't have any already and just use that and fleece for a while so you can swap it daily. Most of my pigs enjoy laying on the vet bed.

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Delaine
Supporter in '14

Post   » Sat Feb 20, 2016 9:08 pm


Thank you so much Jaycey for the information. I will hold off on the Epsom salts and maybe just wash her feet. She has developed a dark spot on one back foot which worries me.

I drive about 5 hours every fall and pick up 300 lbs. of new crop hay so I can be generous with it. The hay tray gets dumped every day with additions to the pile when I am at home.

I have a ton of fleece pads I use in the heavy urine areas. They get changed at least twice a day (more often when I am at home) so she isn't sitting on damp bedding for long. I also bought some very soft fleece today to make some new floor covers.

What would you recommend for cream? Is coconut oil a good choice for now? Also I am not familiar with vet bed but will research it.

Thanks again.

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Sun Feb 21, 2016 5:33 am


This stuff --

http://www.mountainside-medical.com/products/thermazene-silver-sulfadiazine-cream-1-50-gram-tube

-- has proven very helpful at our house for reddened feet, or what looks or seems like it might be pre-pre-pododermatitis.

That company is in upstate NY iirc so with any luck they'll ship to Canada. I've always been very satisfied with them.

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Delaine
Supporter in '14

Post   » Sun Feb 21, 2016 11:21 am


Thanks Talishan:

I printed out the ingredients and will see if I can find a similar product here. If not I will try and order it.

I also wanted to talk to Zoe's vet first to see what she recommends.

GrannyJu1
Armcavy

Post   » Sun Feb 21, 2016 11:29 am


Good luck, whatever the vet visit results in. Keep us posted.

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Delaine
Supporter in '14

Post   » Sun Feb 21, 2016 11:38 am


Thanks GrannyJu1. I will let you know what the vet says. The first appointment I could get was next Sunday but I can take her in as an emergency earlier if necessary.

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Delaine
Supporter in '14

Post   » Sat Mar 19, 2016 10:21 pm


I took Zoe to the vet February 28th to have her foot checked. Although it wasn't serious yet she was afraid it could turn into something and wanted me to soak it.

She told me to put a small amount of Hibitane Skin Cleanser 4% on a clean cloth, wet it to make suds and wrap it around her foot for 10 minutes, rinse and dry it. Afterwards I applied coconut oil. After 5 days the scab came off and the skin was smooth underneath.

When the foot looked better I gave Zoe her pile of hay back rather than putting in a rack. After a couple of days of hanging out on the hay it looked like the area might be getting irritated. I put the hay back in a rack and kept soaking her foot.

Zoe's vet has been away on vacation so I can't get in to see her until April 1st. I will continue with the soaks and coconut oil until then.

She also did a wellness check and said one of Zoe's top teeth was thicker and wants me to monitor it. I haven't been able to see what she is talking about but I did notice Zoe's bottom teeth are a good length but have a slight slant to them. I will discuss this at her next appointment.

Zoe is having no trouble eating any of her food and her weight is good. I am weighing her and monitoring her closely looking for any signs of a more serious dental issue.

Any advice would be appreciated.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Sun Mar 20, 2016 7:44 am


You might want to read over gl/chinsling.html in case the slant gets worse/more prominent.

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Sun Mar 20, 2016 5:22 pm


Odd incisors, thickening incisors, third incisors, peg incisors are not terribly uncommon as the pig ages. We've had several with them. Some have needed to be regularly clipped; others were just weird but caused the pig no problem.

They can sometimes (not always, but sometimes) be related to heart compromise. How old is she (without reading back), and does she have any (other) signs of heart compromise?

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Delaine
Supporter in '14

Post   » Sun Mar 20, 2016 7:27 pm


Thanks Lynx for the link. I hope I will never need to go that route but it is good to know there are options.

Thanks Talishan: You have eased my mind somewhat. Zoe will turn 5 years old next Saturday so she is heading into her senior years.

I have a vet appointment on April 1st. We did an X-ray the end of February when I took her in for her foot. Always on the lookout for stones. I wonder if the view will show her heart. I didn't see the X-ray but will ask her vet to bring it up so I can have a look.

I did have a question for you Talishan. I am going to get some Silver Sulfadiazene. It sounds like you don't have to cover it so if she licks it will that be okay? From what I have read it is from the Sulfa Drug family of antibiotics which I believe are safe for piggies.

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Sun Mar 20, 2016 8:07 pm


The angle of the rad they use for stones (at least the latest one my vet took) doesn't always show the thoracic cavity clearly. If they're not sure when they look at her old rad, consider asking for another.

Does she have any other signs of developing heart impairment?

http://www.guinealynx.info/heart.html

If so -- especially at her age -- I'd want a trial of benazepril for her if she were mine.

One of the nice things about the silver sulfadiazene cream is that yes, the AB in it is a sulfa drug. You don't want them ingesting gobs of it, but if they get a little off their feet when grooming it won't be a problem.

You don't have to cover it unless the foot is bad enough to actually need bandaged. I will say use only a small amount. It doesn't soak into the skin, so a light layer, well spread, should do the job.

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Delaine
Supporter in '14

Post   » Sun Mar 20, 2016 9:42 pm


I read over the heart page and so far Zoe has no signs of heart issues. She is active, eating well and her weight is stable. I have been weighing her every other day or so.

If I get a chance I will have my husband take a picture of her foot. The skin is smooth and there are no open sores but there is something not quite right. Sort of a bruised looking area?? It is hard to explain. They are red but that has been a concern of mine every since they were babies. I ask their vet about their feet every time I take them in.

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Delaine
Supporter in '14

Post   » Fri Jun 10, 2016 6:44 pm


Zoe has been to the vet twice since my last post, once for a treatment plan and another for a follow up.

Her vet suggested soaking her back foot with diluted Hibitane Skin Cleanser 4% which I did. After rinsing and drying the area I applied a thin coat of coconut oil for moisture. Within a week the small area of concern had healed. It was a small round area that had a flap of skin sticking out.

She checked all her feet and said Zoe has Hyperkeratosis on one of her front feet. I notice it on both front feet. She said it is nothing to worry about and sees it quite often.

I do have a question. Is Hyperkeratosis the same as spurs? Looking at pictures I think so.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Fri Jun 10, 2016 10:51 pm


Possibly. I think hyperkeratosis might also apply to other conditions.

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Sat Jun 11, 2016 4:46 am


Hyperkeratosis is a fancy med word for ... a callous. Dry, thickened skin. Lots and lots of animals, usually older (human included) get this. You should see my poor husband's hands in the wintertime. :-/

Spurs aren't exactly the same thing in my mind -- they are dark pieces of a keratinous-like substance that grow out of the footpad and around the foot -- but I suspect it's a similar idea. Spurs aren't a problem until they get long enough to get caught on bedding or hay, then they can tear and cause an injury.

We clip them at that point. Clip carefully; be careful not to nick the foot skin, but if you get reasonably close they often just crumble off at the skin line. Very weird.

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Delaine
Supporter in '14

Post   » Thu Jul 07, 2016 9:58 pm


I have noticed blood on the fleece a couple of times this week and the pet sitter said she saw some blood when she was looking after my sows last week.

I am used to seeing blood but this is more than usual and there is a strong odor that is new. Both girls are acting normal and neither show any pain so I wasn't sure if it was Abbey or Zoe.

I finally narrowed it down to Zoe. Zoe has been spayed but is prone to stones. Her last X-ray showed only sludge so I am concerned it may be a bladder infection although I would think she would have some pain on urinating.

I am going to drop off a urine sample tomorrow to one of the local vets for testing. They are not familiar with guinea pigs but I have used their lab before.

If it is a urinary tract infection I don't trust them on the dose of antibiotic. I will ask for Bactrim but what dose should I ask for?

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Fri Jul 08, 2016 3:29 am



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Delaine
Supporter in '14

Post   » Fri Jul 08, 2016 12:50 pm


Thank you.

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Delaine
Supporter in '14

Post   » Fri Jul 15, 2016 6:54 pm


I just got back from the vet. I took a urine sample in to be tested and Zoe has an urinary tract infection. She is on Bactrim, 0.8 ml every 12 hours for 7 days. I hope she likes strawberry flavor.

My girls are over 5 years old and this is the first time I have given them antibiotics. The funny thing is she shows no discomfort when urinating. Although she frequently has blood in her urine it was the slight smell that sent up the red flags.

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