Zoe's Medical Thread

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Lynx
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Post   » Fri Mar 06, 2015 8:15 pm


Yes, they might be able to use them (rather than compost them). I had old pellets that neither the squirrels nor the birds cared for.

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Delaine
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Post   » Fri Mar 06, 2015 10:25 pm


Lynx: Nessa said she would normally recommend giving excess pellets to a rescue but because the pellets with the field peas are not popular and there are more than a few guinea pigs that won't eat them she suggests composting them. Her exact words were "At this point we're just wanting them gone.

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Lynx
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Post   » Fri Mar 06, 2015 11:08 pm


:-(

My chicken didn't like the field peas in the "organic" chicken feed I got last summer.

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Delaine
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Post   » Sun Mar 08, 2015 1:59 pm


It is going to be a very long two weeks until Zoe's spay surgery. The date is March 24th so actually over two weeks.

She is not only driving herself crazy but constantly bothering Abbey with her rumbling and mounting. Zoe has been rumbling for 22 days. Abbey is getting stressed and starting to lose weight. So now I am getting stressed because as you all know when the pigs aren't happy it affects the humans in their life.

It helps if I give them tiny pieces of greens throughout the day to encourage hay eating and give Zoe something else to focus on. Once I get them out eating it will continue for awhile.

Any suggestions?

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Lynx
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Post   » Sun Mar 08, 2015 6:34 pm


Breaks for Abbey? With food and calm?

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Delaine
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Post   » Sun Mar 08, 2015 9:43 pm


Thanks Lynx

That is a good idea. I did give them a longer floor time today which seemed to help. Also when I am home puttering around the kitchen I can monitor them and redirect Zoe if I hear her rumbling. The problem is I am not always at home to intervene.

Talishan
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Post   » Mon Mar 09, 2015 1:25 am


Might a tiny bit of pain medication help? Even though this is probably not outright pain, I've noticed in the past that a couple of aspirin actually has a slight calming effect on me (in addition to working on a headache).

Or even a tiny, tiny amount of Valium (diazepam) -- if your vet would be willing to give you an infinitesimal amount of it.

Hopefully Zoe's hormones will ease off, at least for a little bit, somewhere between now and the 24th.

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Delaine
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Post   » Mon Mar 09, 2015 11:32 am


Thanks Talishan:

She was a little bit better yesterday. I was home all day cutting out fabric for cuddle cups in the kitchen so was able to monitor her. It was really bad a couple of days ago because Abbey was also in heat but she is done so hopefully things will settle down.

If things get unbearable I will definitely talk to her vet. Thanks for the suggestion. I almost phoned and begged for them to get her in a week early but I know her vet is booked solid with rabbits and a pot belly pig.

Talishan
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Post   » Tue Mar 10, 2015 1:57 am


If they're "in sync" it's the worst. Hopefully that won't happen again before the 24th.

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Delaine
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Post   » Tue Mar 10, 2015 6:51 pm


You are right Talishan. They have been in sync now for several heats and it is the worst.

I am already going over things in my head regarding the surgery. Abbey's sebaceous cyst removal is the only surgery I have experienced with guinea pigs.

What is the easiest way to check underneath to see how the spay incision is doing? I don't want to hurt her but I will need to make sure everything is okay.

My girls climb into a cuddle cup to be picked up so I don't pick them up with my hands except at the vet office or when they get their nails cut.

Talishan
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Post   » Wed Mar 11, 2015 3:00 am


If possible -- get a good-sized hand mirror, and place a table and bright light near the cage.

Get the mirror as clean as possible and put it on the table. It helps if you can rig this so the mirror is right underneath the light.

At our house what we've done with any abdominal surgery is to pick the pig up, as gently as possible, with both hands supporting the abdomen and back end. Once the lifting is done and your left hand is securely supporting the abdomen, then shift your right hand (I'm assuming you're right-handed; reverse if you're left-handed) up under the chest with one front leg between your fingers. Do this over the cage so that if she moves unexpectedly, she won't go far.

Tote her over to the light and gently move your supporting hand away, or to the side of, the incision. Look at it in the mirror. This way you won't have to flip her upright except for cleaning, medication and handfeeding if necessary.

Keep her as horizontal as possible.

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Lynx
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Post   » Wed Mar 11, 2015 11:49 am


I bet (depending on the cage) you might even be able to put the mirror in there and kind of herd the guinea pig onto it (treats?) so lifting might even not be necessary (or just a small amount of vertical lifting).

p.s. going to add something to the post op page regarding your method of checking the incision.

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Delaine
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Post   » Wed Mar 11, 2015 6:40 pm


Thanks Talishan and Lynx:

I will use your method Talishan, only have her climb into the cuddle cup first so I don't have to chase her around the cage. Once she is in the cuddle cup and out of the cage she will be easy to gently lift. Then I could hold her over the mirror. I made oval cuddle cups so they are a good size and shape for a piggy and easy for them to climb into.

If I put the mirror in the cage, Lynx, I am not sure how I would see under her when she is on the mirror. If I reach in to try and lift her front end even a little when she is on the mirror she will bolt because I have never picked them up from the cage with my hands. I always use a transfer box or cuddle cup. I find it less stressful for them and me.

I always use a mirror to check the girls' bottom end but all I have to do is fold back the cuddle cup so her bottom is hanging free and exposed and then I check in the mirror so using a mirror makes sense.

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Lynx
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Post   » Wed Mar 11, 2015 11:58 pm


For what it's worth, there are small flexible tool mirrors that mechanics use to see in difficult places. Combined with good light (shining a flashlight on the mirror can illuminate the area).

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Delaine
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Post   » Thu Mar 12, 2015 11:20 am


I will check these out Lynx. Thanks. I am a bit of a worrier and a planner so my mind needs to have everything in order in advance of the surgery.

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Lynx
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Post   » Thu Mar 12, 2015 2:24 pm



Talishan
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Post   » Fri Mar 13, 2015 7:14 am


Being a worrier and a planner eminently qualifies you for the job of guinea pig caretaker -- especially just prior to surgery. That's when knowing everything in advance is really vital.

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Delaine
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Post   » Thu Mar 19, 2015 11:11 am


Zoe has been rumbling since February 15th, so just over a month, and then stopped two days ago. Nothing. She is eating like a piggy, gained some weight and is so calm and content. Abbey is thrilled.

What is this all about? Just when I was feeling confident about my decision to have her spayed on Tuesday I am now questioning myself. If I cancel the appointment it would probably all start up again. That is why we spend big bucks on an ultrasound so we know for sure what is going on.

Should I have an ultrasound done or go through with the spay? What to do?

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Catie Cavy
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Post   » Thu Mar 19, 2015 8:35 pm


That’s a tough one. Maybe call your vet and see what she suggests? Postponing it wouldn’t hurt, but then again, as you say, she will probably start right up again as soon as you cancel. Would an ultrasound be expensive? Was the vet comfortable with her diagnosis even though she couldn't feel any cysts?

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Delaine
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Post   » Fri Mar 20, 2015 12:11 am


I think I am still leaning towards the spay. Although her vet couldn't feel cysts Zoe seemed uncomfortable and reacted when she pressed into her abdomen where her ovaries where situated. Abbey didn't react at all when she was examined. So based on the tenderness and continuous rumbling her vet feels cysts are definitely a possibility.

Regardless Zoe's heat cycles are getting longer and longer and her cycles never last less than 8 days. This has been going on for awhile now so I think her quality of life will be better once she has recovered from the spay. She never really feels well when she is in heat and hides more and doesn't eat as much. Also Abbey's quality of life will be better when she is not being tormented by her hormonal sister.

The last ultrasound I had done on Abbey in June 2013 was $341.00 and a spay is only $150 plus she wants to do some blood work before the surgery which will be extra.

I must admit I am better with black and white and not grey so I was actually happy when I heard a small rumble from Zoe this evening.

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