Fuzzbutt's Medical

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Feb 11, 2016 8:37 am


Seeing any green soft stinky poops in the cage?

GrannyJu1
Armcavy

Post   » Thu Feb 11, 2016 9:35 am


Soft poos, yes, stinky or sticky: a few stuck to fleece now and then, but usually none stuck to piggy feet. Stinky, definitely. As I scoop, I sweep them all (or most of 'em) together then pick them up. That can be smelly, or I'll lean over a corner of the cage to clean, or even one that's already been cleared, and that can be smelly. Greenish poos? Nope.

What exactly causes boar odor? Can neutered boars produce it? (Peek)

Do grease glands smell, and/or leave the fleece smelling awful? I just noticed yesterday what I think might be a dirty one on The Veeb. I won't have time to give her a bath today, but definitely will tomorrow. (I hate doctors of all kinds. Except vets. Maybe I need to go see one of those for me, that way I won't be discriminating) So, bath for Vee tomorrow; extreme exam for Peek and Fuzz. That's what I have planned anyway.

Poor Fuzz; all this time I blamed her simply because she's the one with the soft poos, for the most part. I have to figure this out for all of our sakes. One of them could be sick or if not, simply because I already spend a great part of my day nauseated from my meds.

Another puzzling odor came from the other cage and while I did manage to isolate the source, again I can't figure out the cause; it was a sour, wet soft wood smell. It had to be urine, but not a normal urine odor. It came from one of the fleece cloths I put under the hay, and I have had a heck of a time washing it out. Naturally I washed it with other dirty items then the whole dang load came out smelling to high heaven. I washed the load twice more and finally used Nature's Miracle. The smell is still there but very, very faint.

I'd say it's all in my head (I've been having really strange olfactory hallucinations lately), except my husband can also smell these two odors, just not as strongly as I.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Feb 11, 2016 1:01 pm


There is a scent gland that produces odors. The poops, urine (urine also when a pig has a UTI) all produce odors.

I suspect the special poops which you are not seeing as green may have been more green when I saw them because I was feeding lots of fresh grass and some romaine. Cecal feces are very stinky. Interestingly, chickens also produce them. They are smaller, dark and mushy, and smell the most.

GrannyJu1
Armcavy

Post   » Fri Feb 12, 2016 9:41 am


Whatever it was seems to have dissipated since I turned the flippers. Maybe I just waited too long to do so. My absorbent fabric may not be as effective as uhaul felt, but it's a darn sight cheaper. I'll just have to get used to it and clean the cage a a day or so earlier. I suspect Fuzz may have eaten something she shouldn't have, since it hasn't re-occured. Besides, we all know how paranoid I can be.

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Sat Feb 13, 2016 3:57 am


Paranoid is far better than negligent. Carry on. ;-)

I will say that feces mixed in with hay dust, then peed on makes a wretched smell. FWIW.

GrannyJu1
Armcavy

Post   » Sun Feb 14, 2016 12:10 pm


RE: arthritis and pain meds

The only things they've ever found with her was some gas (not surprising with her soft, smelly poos) and some arthritis. It seems as if it wasn't too long after I brought her home, maybe 4-6 months old, she quit popcorns and laps. Unless she's running from me, she's a slow mover, and even then, she's the easiest to catch. She wheeks a little but not as much as her cage mates. One vet put her on the daily dose of .78 (lowest strength) of the Metacam, another concurred with the diagnoses of arthritis and agreed with the treatment plan. At first I was really bad about giving it to her & Peek daily, then when I did manage to get into the habit of daily dosing, it took a week for me to notice she was even less mobile - out of choice it appeared but still less, so I took her off it. It had been a month or more since I quit when I noticed how miserable she was last week, hunched, puffed (that's hard to notice with her breed!), so I gave her the tiniest dose I could draw up of the strongest strength Metacam (1.5ml). Suddenly I had the romping baby I hadn't seen in forever, back.

Our vet told me a few weeks ago he was expecting to receive a dental x-ray machine and we should wait until then to do more x-rays because the detail would be a world of difference from the digital ones done last summer/fall, so we've been waiting. I'll call his office to see if he's received it and just forgot to call me. If they don't have a definitely (soon) date for getting it, think I should just go ahead and get the regular old fashioned film x-rays he uses?

I haven't told him yet about the incident last week where I gave her the equivalent of 2 little drops of Metacam. Do you think it would be worth it to try her on that as a daily regimen? Or will that raise the risk more dangerous results? The one tiny dose has appeared to give her some relief for a little over 24 hours now. I'm not sure how she's feeling today. Didn't see any popcorns or play with Peek and/or The Veeb last night. Yesterday morning she was still going strong.

I'm not sure if Dr. W's practice is open today, but will call as soon as husband wakes up so my voice doesn't disturb him.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Sun Feb 14, 2016 1:07 pm


I am guessing the vet would go along with trying some tiny doses to see if it makes a difference. The tiny dose might have been a fluke or might have been the cause of improving.

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Sun Feb 14, 2016 7:16 pm


From your pain meds thread: Rimadyl (carprofen).

The first vet we ever saw used carprofen, because Metacam wasn't in common use for small furries at the time. I've had a handful of pigs unable to tolerate Metacam for more than a few days who did just fine on Rimadyl.

NSAIDs work both the liver and kidneys. It's my understanding Rimadyl is a little harder on the liver and Metacam a little harder on the kidneys, but in my opinion chronic pain relief is much more important unless the pig is in outright kidney or liver compromise.

One vet wanted bloodwork every six months for a long-term Rimadyl patient. There was never any problem that appeared with it.

You could go up to a low dose of a mild narcotic like Tramadol, but that shouldn't be necessary (yet, anyway).

Rimadyl does not come in a liquid and will need to be compounded by a veterinary pharmacy. Here's the one my vet uses:

http://www.roadrunnerpharmacy.com/

You can compound it yourself, but most vets only have the chewables for dogs that are loaded with a liver-flavored filler. If your vet uses a tablet, they need to get these:

http://www.revivalanimal.com/Carprofen-Caplets-Generic.html

CAPLET NOT CHEWABLE!

All that said, if tinytiny doses of 1.5 mg/mL Metacam does the trick without crashing her, go with that.

GrannyJu1
Armcavy

Post   » Sun Feb 14, 2016 7:22 pm


Thanks, Talishan. I'll give him a call asap.

GrannyJu1
Armcavy

Post   » Fri Feb 19, 2016 1:24 pm


Talked with vet a few days ago. He agrees that the tiniest dose would be ok, but thinks holding using it until she actively shows signs of pain, as she did the day I gave her a couple of drops of the Metacam. He doesn't want to use anything else until she's a lot worse.

Still no dental x-ray machine, but after spending well over a couple of hours across about 3 phone calls, I don't think he'll forget to notify me when it arrives. He probably cringes when his girlfriend/receptionist says I'm on the phone. Fortunately, I can tell that SHE likes me, my attitude, and my feelings for animals.

He's also doing some research on a new California company that is making some digestive tablets for guinea pigs. If they do end up looking good to him, he'll put some on his shelves to sell.

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Wheekers3

Post   » Fri Feb 19, 2016 1:44 pm


GranJu, something that might help make her more comfortable is a lizzard heating pad. They're low heat, and guinea pig sized.

I made a point of putting ours in with no pigs present so they wouldn't all run over for a look. You can hide the cord discreetly by cutting a slit in the coroplast, threading the cord through it and then covering the heater with the cage liner and blankies.

I also used a automotive wiring cover to prevent chewing any other places a pig may be able to grab ahold of. Ask the Mr. he may have some he can root up for you, if he's automotively inclined. Otherwise all auto stores or Amazon has it, in pretty colors even.

GrannyJu1
Armcavy

Post   » Fri Feb 19, 2016 1:55 pm


I bought one of those ceramic plates you heat in the microwave and it has a fleece (or something similar) cover for protection. I think I put it under her once, but she's a mover and didn't want to really settle down on it. Peekaboo, on the other hand, really wanted to pancake down, but he's my most nervous pig so while he did sink down, no pancakes for me! Maybe the way to work this is to put 2 pads in the cage so one is always available for Fuzz.

Did you mean electrical tape, or is there some other heavier cover.

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Wheekers3

Post   » Fri Feb 19, 2016 2:21 pm


No, its a tough plastic tube with a slit all the way down its length to slip the wire into. Its slightly larger then a cord and bends if you need it to. I originally used it to keep the parrot from biting lamp cords on our end table.

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Wheekers3

Post   » Fri Feb 19, 2016 2:26 pm


like this:
http://www.amazon.com/Support-Split-Flexible-Tubing-Conduit/dp/B00U8L9WUK

the diameter looks a little large, but comes in many sizes. Automotive stores may sell by the foot, too.

GrannyJu1
Armcavy

Post   » Fri Feb 19, 2016 3:02 pm


GREAT! Thanks, Wheek! I know what you're talking about now, and I'm ON it! ;o)

GrannyJu1
Armcavy

Post   » Wed Mar 09, 2016 1:03 am


Sunday a friend and I were watching the pigs and saw Fuzz drop some soft green poos, instead of bending and grabbing. She then turned around and ate them. I really do think she can't bend to pull them out the normal way.

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Wed Mar 09, 2016 9:21 pm


However she gets them, as long as she gets them. ;-)

GrannyJu1
Armcavy

Post   » Wed Jun 22, 2016 9:10 pm


While trying to cut Fuzz's claws by myself today, I cut one too short. When it began to bleed, I opened the styptic powder to stick her foot in and the powder was a rock, not powder. Apparently it got moist sometime in the last month. While poor Fuzz was bleeding all over the pad she was on, I attempted to loosen it enough to get a little powder. I managed, but just barely and I don't think it works anymore. I just found 2 more large bloody spots where she's been laying. One is pinky fingernail size the other slightly smaller. I think it's finally quit bleeding, but now I'm worried about infection. What would the signs be? I assume heat would be one, but what are others? Should I just take her to the vet tomorrow "in case"?

Talishan
You can quote me

Post   » Wed Jun 22, 2016 9:30 pm


Watch for swelling of the toe. Any discharge from the nail; reddening of the toe, or heat.

In my experience she'll likely be fine. But keep an eye on the tissue of the toe closest to the nail for any developments.

Could you just call your vet and ask what they think? Then you can take her in if they think it's needed. My guess is that they won't, but it'd probably help you feel a bit better.

GrannyJu1
Armcavy

Post   » Wed Jun 22, 2016 9:38 pm


Thanks, Talishan. The only reason I worry a little bit is because Fuzz is the one with the chronic soft poos, and it did bleed a fair amount. :'o(

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