Bladder Stone study

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Lynx
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Post   » Wed Jan 11, 2012 9:22 pm


I use the USDA database but for the percentage, I think you need dry weight comparisons. It's more complicated to calculate but more reasonable.

I did comparisons based on calories in the chart because that is what feeds our guinea pigs and keeps them going.

gl/chart.html

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AldenM1
Supporter in '16

Post   » Thu Feb 09, 2012 11:09 am


Okay, I have a question, because I'm really confused.

When I look at that veggie chart, which is so helpfully sortable, do I want to be aiming for veggies that are low in calcium TOTAL? or lower in the Ca:P ratio? I figured they'd be the same and they're really not. And I'm now in possession of some yummy-looking (and popular) Swiss chard that is low on the latter and astronomical on the former.

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Lynx
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Post   » Thu Feb 09, 2012 8:09 pm


I don't really know the answer to your question but would aim for overall lower calcium. You can still feed favorite or otherwise rich foods in moderation. I put a color code in to help people visualize how other nutrients stack up per calorie you are feeding.

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AldenM1
Supporter in '16

Post   » Mon Feb 20, 2012 10:00 am


For future reference, Dr. Ahearn's response to the above question was "both."

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Lynx
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Post   » Mon Feb 20, 2012 10:05 am


You would look for closer to "optimal" Ca:P ratio and overall lower calcium then, right?

Grains would have a very low Ca:P ratio and are low in calcium but not very good for the gut, for example.

Nibblenlick

Post   » Sun Aug 26, 2012 3:40 pm


Hi, I've been using this site for reference purposes for a few years now but never registered.
However, my boar 'Treacle' who I got as a piggie with 'problems' from a rescue centre only a few months ago was diagnosed with stones four days ago after a steady decline in appetite over three days.

He had both running lice and a URI when I brought him home and after a round of Baytril and Ivomec was becoming a happy little lad up until the eating decline.

The stones were removed, which I have from the vet in a sterile container, unfortunately though - after a very, very brave fight poor sickly little chap lost the fight despite all the stops being pulled out.

Thank you for putting the link to the stone study up, this came on very suddenly with only the slightest sign of 'rump' tenderness when having cuddles, no real 'symptoms' such as blood in the urine or the like.

Poor little Treacle , with evidence of a previous bumblefoot and missing an ear from a scrap with something he obviously came off worse with, hope I gave you a happy home, if only for a short while.

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Lynx
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Post   » Sun Aug 26, 2012 10:05 pm


I am so very sorry you lost him, Nibble'n'lick. It sounds like you absolutely did right by Treacle. He was lucky to have found you. Yes, sometimes there seem to be almost no signs and a guinea pig can have stones.

guineasgalore

Post   » Tue Aug 06, 2013 6:26 am


I have had many bladder stone probs with my piggys over the years after long research thr main cause is too much calcium I foumd the cause to be oxbow timothy pellets. I stopped these and all my problems have gone aaay.. well all.my piggys problems

nelly_2

Post   » Wed Oct 23, 2013 5:12 am


Nice!

Morning_shadow

Post   » Thu Oct 24, 2013 11:08 am


@guineasgalore I agree. These pellets seem to be very good, but still high in calcium. I find any store brand pellet to be a big problem. Not only for stones but many have seeds which are bad for them.
I have posted in another post the current diet I give my piggies. I think the best thing to do is to not give too much variety in the veggies given daily. And please cavy lovers highly reduce the timothy hay pellets.

If I try to email these pellet brand companies.. do you think they will listen? What about those alfalfa and yogurt treats.. These things are so unnecesary.

Morning_shadow

Post   » Thu Oct 24, 2013 1:29 pm


I have called Kaytee brand and have told them that their pellets are high in calcium.. and I had previously used their brand for some time.. any beginner would have since it is in most stores. I told them to please check the calcium content because it is higher than Oxbow and KMS.. That the calcium is the main reason for these stones..
Not only that but also spoke about the alfalfa and how most beginners would not really know the difference between the hays and make this mistake.
I don't know if others here have tried speaking to them? I doubt my calling would make a difference.. but I think if more of us would call these big manufacturers maybe someday they can make changes to their products and bladder stones could be reduced.

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