A diet without Pellets - your input for my project.

spikes mom

Post   » Thu Aug 05, 2004 9:43 am


Blueberries grow wild in the mountains not far from me. My friend and I make blueberry jam every summer - it is the best! Sometimes we pick too many berries, wash, dry and freeze them for whatever use later. They really hold up well in the freezer. The wild berries are much smaller than the ones I see in the store and actually have a much better flavor!

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Aug 05, 2004 1:03 pm


I have a single wild blueberry plant in my garden. It only does so-so (and some cultivated ones, though they are not much of a success). Up on the Blue Ridge Parkway there are fields of wild blueberries that one of my friends used to pick. They are tasty. I love blueberry muffins more than anything.

spikes mom

Post   » Thu Aug 05, 2004 1:29 pm


I'm not sure, but I think that the blueberry plants do better if there is more than one. It has to do with the cross-pollination. Perhaps a "buddy" plant would make yours more productive. Also, they seem to do better if they are near water or if there is a wet spring - that's a hint if you are looking to collect them.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Aug 05, 2004 1:42 pm


I have a half dozen different plants. They never did all that well. I think too hot in VA.

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-JC-
I gave AGAIN, dammit!

Post   » Thu Aug 05, 2004 7:34 pm


They like acid soil... maybe that's why they don't thrive in some places? We have lots in the forests in Norway - they're great fun to pick and then enjoy the purple tongues.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Aug 05, 2004 9:32 pm


I have fairly acid soil. And we have lots of acid rain :-)

chii
I Love Lucy

Post   » Mon Aug 09, 2004 2:34 pm


Is a vit. D supplement necessary in a diet with no pellets? My vet never mentioned needing anything except the C, but the topic recently came up in a conversation I was having with someone, and now I'm curious.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Mon Aug 09, 2004 3:43 pm


Let your pigs get 10-15 minutes a day of sunshine.

Pigwig

Post   » Mon Aug 09, 2004 3:47 pm


I think you must be careful supplementing with fat-soluble vitamins like A & D. The body can store these vitamins and any excess is harmful. If your piggies get time outside in the sunlight, this is the most natural way for them to get vitamin D. I don't know of any vegetable sources.

Hope this helps

chii
I Love Lucy

Post   » Mon Aug 09, 2004 3:56 pm


Sadly, my guys never get outside as I'm positive our entire apartment complex grounds are treated with god knows what. I do, however, have huge bay windows in my living room, so they get a lot of bright light, although not direct. Do you think that's sufficient?

Would it be better for someone who can't take pigs outside and doesn't get much light in doors to supplement or to not supplement? Maybe a very occasional supplement? I'm hoping someone will have an answer...

Erin8607
Knee Deep

Post   » Fri Nov 19, 2004 8:22 pm


Thought I'd bring this back up, I'm starting my "project" this week - in fact, just pulled the pellet dish and weighed my victims er I mean pigs that I'm using.

Fudge is 1245 grams
Raven is 1040 grams
Hannah is 1085 grams

I still havent' worked out all the details of the project, but I need to get started on the main "experiment" considering I only have about 4 1/2 weeks.

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Brianna
Forum Fan Club

Post   » Fri Nov 19, 2004 9:25 pm


Erin, I didn't realize that this was an old thread so I read it from the beginning. I saw that you can do your project on reproduction. Since you have so many pregnant pigs, can you do some sort of projects on the pregnancies, deliveries and whether the babies thrived or not?

Erin8607
Knee Deep

Post   » Fri Nov 19, 2004 9:32 pm


This is a new quarter, new paper, new instructions, new teacher. I've already turned in this topic, though I'll see if I can find a way to do it on repro. But, I think this will work out with what I have in mind as a general outline./

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katk925
Do the Dewlap in '05

Post   » Sat Nov 20, 2004 8:05 am


When I brought home a rescue girl that was having diarreah from the switch to good food my vet put her on a no pellet, high timothy, low veg (dark greens only, not high water ones, like romain) diet to help her digestion settle into the new diet. After a week I started going back to the added pellets and large variety of veg. Now she has nice perfect poops!

~kat

GilbertGuacamole

Post   » Fri Dec 31, 2010 8:48 pm


If I wanted to start a pellet free diet for my pigs, what veggies and what amounts would I want to feed?

Cinnabuns Legacy

Post   » Sat Jan 01, 2011 1:13 am


I think if someone wants to go pelletless they should supplement with fresh organic wheat grass since it has a lot of natural nutrients in it, and possibly a vitamin B complex supplement as well (just make sure it doesn't have animal products or byproducts, unnatural dyes, etcetera).

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PinkRufus
Contributor in 2014

Post   » Sat Jan 01, 2011 2:12 am


Here's some pellet free diet information:
http://www.guinealynx.info/records/viewtopic.php?t=82

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