Rhubarb?

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Japonica26

Post   » Thu Jan 05, 2012 7:44 am


I just noticed that the local shop is now stocking rhubarb and was wondering if it was suitable pig fare. The stalks obviously, not the leaves, which aren't safe for anyone...

If yes, I could include it once or twice a week to break up the monotony of their usual fare. I think they look at their food dishes and say, "Aaargh...lettuce, cilantro, cucumber, zucchini, and peppers again...are you kidding me?" (They also get the occasional bit of carrot, small serving of fruit, and the limited serves of parsley etc.)

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Jan 05, 2012 10:35 am


I would not feed it.

Josephine
Little Jo Wheek

Post   » Thu Jan 05, 2012 11:35 am


Nope, not considered safe. Way too much oxalic acid. The entire plant is considered toxic to animals. Probably to humans, too, but the humans can handle the toxins better...

Japonica26

Post   » Thu Jan 05, 2012 7:27 pm


Thanks for the info. Whew. It's a good thing I checked with you first. :)

Jazzbox

Post   » Thu Jan 05, 2012 10:39 pm


"lettuce, cilantro, cucumber, zucchini, and peppers"

No tomato?

(Also, wondering exactly what kind of vegetable is signified by "lettuce".)

Japonica26

Post   » Fri Jan 06, 2012 4:28 am


Yeah, they get a small amount of tomato, every second day.

Lettuce = Cos (romaine) in rotation due to calcium issues it can cause in some pigs. Green oak lettuce, red oak lettuce, green coral lettuce, butter lettuce. That should be fine I thought...Am I missing something?

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pigjes
Cavy Comic

Post   » Fri Jan 06, 2012 5:33 am


Part of the oxalic acid gets broken down during cooking. Rhubarb tends to be on the cooker long, as it needs to get soft to make compote out of it. That makes it edible for humans only.

Jazzbox

Post   » Fri Jan 06, 2012 6:01 am


"Lettuce = Cos (romaine) in rotation due to calcium issues it can cause in some pigs. Green oak lettuce, red oak lettuce, green coral lettuce, butter lettuce. That should be fine I thought...Am I missing something?"

It is a terminological question. Where I am, the word "lettuce" signifies iceberg lettuce and nothing else. "Lettuce cos" is never heard, although romaine is very common. The reason why I asked for the clarification is because, as you probably know, iceberg lettuce, specifically, is harmful for guinea pigs. So that was my concern.

Japonica26

Post   » Fri Jan 06, 2012 7:09 am


"It is a terminological question. Where I am, the word "lettuce" signifies iceberg lettuce and nothing else. "Lettuce cos" is never heard, although romaine is very common. The reason why I asked for the clarification is because, as you probably know, iceberg lettuce, specifically, is harmful for guinea pigs. So that was my concern."

No worries. I know all about the iceberg thing. I was just being thrifty with my typing by putting all the green leafy items that are 1) allowable and 2) not "greens" under "lettuce."

"Romaine" is never mentioned here. It's known as Cos. One of those expat things I had to learn when the locals look at me like I have two heads for asking for an item with terminology that is just not used here. ;)

Pigjes...yeah, I was never a fan of rhubarb as a youngster but like it very much in my ahem, more mature years. Strawberry-rhubarb muffins. Stewed rhubarb. Mmm. Oh well, the pigs can look on in envy. :)

bpatters
And got the T-shirt

Post   » Fri Jan 06, 2012 8:53 am


I don't think iceberg is harmful for pigs, it's just not helpful. There are very few nutrients in it, for people or for pigs.

Jazzbox

Post   » Fri Jan 06, 2012 9:13 am


http://www.guinealynx.info/fave.html says:
"Iceberg lettuce is best not offered guinea pigs; it is low in nutrients and according to some people, could cause loose stools if given in excess."

I am pretty sure that I have read that the oxalic acid content of iceberg lettuce is unacceptably high. I will have to check my books here. If it were the case that the only "harmful" property of iceberg lettuce is that it is essentially "crunchy water" with no nutritional value, then there could not, by definition, be any harm in feeding it to guinea pigs - as long as they got sufficient nutrients from the rest of their diet.

Raz

Post   » Sun Jan 08, 2012 2:03 pm


I have eaten raw rhubarb in the past and didn't suffer any ill effects. You do need to dip it in sugar first though. I wouldn't give it to a guinea pig though.

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Tracy

Post   » Fri Jul 14, 2017 8:28 am


I just learned rhubarb can be deadly for pets and now believe that's what killed my little Kiwi at a Boston Pignic years ago. I saw someone adding a pink-stemmed veg into the girls' piggy pen, and saw Kiwi eating some. I thought it was Swiss Chard (which I believe is OK) and didn't know anything about the dangers of rhubarb. I suspect the person just brought some veggies from her garden that day and also didn't know. And ultimately her death is my fault -- for bringing piggies to a potentially dangerous event and for not noticing something was wrong until seconds prior to her last breath. I'm posting as a HUGE WARNING: Do not feed rhubarb!! Here's a link of dangerous plants with images: https://www.littlethings.com/common-deadly-plants/ Wish I knew this years ago. RIP, little Kiwi... I'm so sorry.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Fri Jul 14, 2017 10:31 pm


This makes me wonder if my chicken who suddenly had respiratory issues (trouble breathing) and died might have eaten something bad in the garden (several of those plants are in my garden). Usually plants that are bad for you taste bitter or in some other way are unappetizing.

I am sorry about your guinea pig.

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