Baby boars fighting

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piggypals

Post   » Sat Aug 11, 2018 7:09 pm


Hi I'm looking for advice.my baby boars have been fighting. The person who sold them told us said the were brothers but we are not sure for one is Abyssinian and the other is an American piggy. We have also discovered They had mites due to itching and bald patches and the American one is reluctant to being hand fed or petted. We are using treatment for mites. My daughter noticed that the small Abyssinian piggy has scabs on it's back leg and paw. We don't know if it is an injury or if it is something else. Any advice about what it is or how we treat it? They have been fighting we are not sure about biting but the bigger one Chewy(the american one) has been clambering on top of Choco (smaller abysissian) I'm not sure what to do. My daughter loves them but had to make a barrier out of twigs to keep big one at the top because he is depriving Choco of food. Any advice is welcome. Thank you!

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lisam

Post   » Sat Aug 11, 2018 9:50 pm


What's your cage setup? It's normal for males to go through a period of trying to figure out which one will be dominant, and they need a good sized cage to do it in.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Sat Aug 11, 2018 11:11 pm


Big cages help a lot. Are you using ivermectin or Revolution to treat them for mites?
www.guinealynx.info/mites.html

bpatters
And got the T-shirt

Post   » Sat Aug 11, 2018 11:38 pm


Have you turned them both over and compared their private parts to confirm that they're both boars?

They can have different hair types and still be litter mates. And being brothers has absolutely nothing to do with their ability (or lack of same) to get along with each other.

Ditto about the cage size. No pet store cage is large enough for two boars.

JX4

Post   » Sat Aug 11, 2018 11:50 pm


We had two litters (both sows got pregnant at the same time from a male who was supposed to be a female). I can assure you that the babies can be brothers and look absolutely nothing alike. In one litter we had a dark brown abyssinian, a pink eyed white himalayan (short hair), and an orange long hair -- all from the same mom and dad. They looked nothing like the dad at all and only the orange long hair looked like the mom.

In the other litter, there were "twins" who looked identical to each other as dark brown frizzy hair like little buffaloes with brillo pads for hair, a dark brown smooth short hair, and roan and white frizzy haired. The dad was roan and white frizzy hair, but the mom looked like a panda (smooth short hair).

If I had not seen them come from each mom I would not have believed they were brothers and sisters, lol.

piggypals

Post   » Sun Aug 12, 2018 5:55 am


We're using ivmetcin to treat the mites I've ordered Xeno 450 as I heard it's stronger. We have a big hutch but the little one doesn't like ramps therefore he can't get away from the bigger one. The big one follows the smaller one and scares him. We were told they were boys by the seller but we can't pick the bog one up because he scratches. We are going to get separate food bowls ,water bottles ECT. Thanks for your help so far.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Sun Aug 12, 2018 7:25 am


Here are some tips for picking up your guinea pig. I would ignore the seller saying you can't pick one up. It is important they get used to handling.

Ideally, you weigh the guinea pigs and apply the correct amount of ivermectin. Note on the package the number of mg of ivermectin each contains and compare it with topical ivermectin rate using 0.5mg/kg
www.guinealynx.info/calculate_dose.html

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PooksiedAnimals
Supporting my GL Habit

Post   » Sun Aug 12, 2018 9:23 am


Mounting is not fighting. That's just dominance behavior, and is not particularly worrisome unless it gets to the point that the one gets no rest from the other to eat or sleep. Scabs on the back paws and legs are odd - but I would guess that's more likely to be self-inflicted than war wounds (those tend to be on the face or the sides.) How are their weights doing?

bpatters
And got the T-shirt

Post   » Sun Aug 12, 2018 12:09 pm


How much do your pigs weigh? Xeno 450 is not recommended for pigs less than 1200 grams.

piggypals

Post   » Sun Aug 12, 2018 3:44 pm


I would say they definitely less than 1200g so maybe won't use the Xeno. Maybe were are being overprotective and fighting/dominance is normal it's just this pitiful crying like sound the small one (choco) seems to make when chewy invades his space. Weight wise the dominant one is bigger, Choco doesn't seem to be as hungry maybe it's his health with mites/scaly leg? No facial wounds which is good. We separated them last night to make sure Choco got food and I think he did eat more but my daughter thinks they missed each other. Thanks again for advice.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Sun Aug 12, 2018 5:02 pm


I had a hard time finding out how much ivermectin is in one pipette. After I did, it seemed pretty obvious.

From this page:
https://www.viovet.co.uk/Xeno-450-Spot-On-Parasite-Flea-Treatment/c9683/
Xeno 450 is a convenient and effective spot-on treatment for use on rabbits, guinea pigs and ferrets over 1.2kg, and birds over 666g. The treatment contains 450 micrograms of the active ingredient Ivermectin- an antiparasitic medicine effective against both ecto and endo-parasites, including fleas, lice, mites and intestinal round-worms. The spot-on is not suitable for use on pregnant or lactating animals, or animals under 16 weeks of age, but is an effective treatment against fur, mange and ear mites in rabbits and guinea pigs, as well as lice in guinea pigs and heartworm in ferrets. The treatment may also be used for rats, mice and gerbils.
Standard topical treatment is 0.5mg/kg if applied topically. If there is only 0.45mg of ivermectin, you can treat a guinea pig of less than but close to a kilo. We do not know the concentration of the suspension. It would be very helpful if one was trying to adjust the dose by amount.
www.guinealynx.info/calculate_dose.html

So the Xeno people are being pretty conservative and perhaps underdosing.

bpatters
And got the T-shirt

Post   » Sun Aug 12, 2018 5:21 pm


The only other Spot-On treatment we've heard about, Beaphar, definitely underdoses. I remember several people having to switch to something stronger.

piggypals

Post   » Thu Aug 16, 2018 2:43 pm


It is beaphar we have and I've read to apply 2nd dose 7-10 days after 1st. I'm doubtful they will clear as guinea pigs still scratching at moment and a week tomorrow since 1st dose. The Xeno has arrived in post but as previous advice post and on box, my piggys too small not sure if I should chance it even Xeno may underdose. Has anyone had any success getting rid of mites with beaphar only?

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Aug 16, 2018 9:01 pm


How much do your guinea pigs weigh again? Do you have an accurate scale?

piggypals

Post   » Fri Aug 17, 2018 7:19 am


We haven't weighed them but they are still quite small compared to some of the massive ones I've seen! Sorry to be so vague. Will go to vet as a last resort buy trying to avoid that at moment.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Fri Aug 17, 2018 9:50 am


You really need a scale. It is such a valuable tool for keeping track of your guinea pig's weight. Read over www.guinealynx.info/weigh.html
Weigh once a week at least, more if you suspect illness.

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GrannyJu1
Supporter in 2018

Post   » Sat Aug 18, 2018 8:32 am



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