Mouth Sores

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Estella

Post   » Mon Aug 12, 2002 8:17 am


Does anyone have any experiance with mouth sores. Chocolat has them on both sides of his mouth. I have already checked them out at two vets already and both replies were that it was a viral problem and should clear up as he gets older. It has been about a month and still no difference. They don´t seem to hurt him yet.
I have read that mouth sores can be caused by apples, so I stopped the supply of apples. This hasn´t really helped. In a book I have read it also mentions that gentian violet can help I have been to numerous chemist and it is no longer permissable to make up these solutions. So I have turned to antiseptic cream (that was the another suggestion from the book). I have been using tea tree cream which says on the tub that it is suitable for guinea pigs. Does anyone know if tea tree cream is ok?
This morning the scabs wiped of very easily (previously I hadn´t been able to move them), so it may be that the cream is working?
If anyone has any suggestions I would be grateful.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Mon Aug 12, 2002 10:40 am


I´m sorry I am unfamiliar with tea tree cream. If it has no antibiotics in it, I would imagine it to be safe but just don´t know.

I rather think your vet is correct about it being a virus.

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lisam

Post   » Mon Aug 12, 2002 10:45 am


I don´t think tea tree cream should be injested, and I would worry that being so close to the mouth it would be bound to get in there.

When my Ruby had mouth sores when she was younger, I didn´t do anything. She had them twice. They cleared up on their own, and she hasn´t had them since.

Estella

Post   » Mon Aug 12, 2002 12:35 pm


That is what I was thinking that he might lick the cream. I have tried to only put a small dab on and massage it in until I cannot see the cream, so hopefully reducing the amount he could lick off.
He often nibbles at his cage bar and run wire. I thought this might be slowing down the process of healing but he has sort of grown out of the habit and doesn´t do it much anymore.
It is quite hard to see if there is much damage or blood even as he has a dark brown coat and is a coronet type so has plenty of facial hair.

Josephine
Little Jo Wheek

Post   » Mon Aug 12, 2002 10:43 pm


AAAKKKKK! Could be chronic chelitis. I have one of my sows affected with it (for the past year). Antibiotics! Are they crusty and in the folds of the lips? I have had to keep my sow on BNP ointment. I tried oral antibiotics, which didn´t work well. Wish I could post a pic. I will see if I can dig up one tomorrow. Don´t have the brains or time for the technology tonight. If this is what it is, it is a Staph sp. infection. Really a battle to keep controlled.

Estella

Post   » Tue Aug 13, 2002 3:05 am


The scabs are in the corners of the lips and they are moist scabs, I don´t think they have ever been crusty. It would be great if you could find a picture so I could compare. Unfortunately I don´t have the technology yet (only new to computers myself) so I can´t post a picture of chocolat to help my description.

Josephine
Little Jo Wheek

Post   » Tue Aug 13, 2002 12:01 pm


Here is a severe case. My sow looked similarly when first diagnosed, but is now under control. The scabs are almost non-existent on her now, but there are moist cracks that I know are uncomfortable. Through the entire ordeal she has eaten well and not lost any weight.

(Pic is from the Self-Assessment Color Review of Small Mammals, by Susan A. Brown and Karen L. Rosenthal, both competent and respected cavy and exotics vets).

Image

Estella

Post   » Tue Aug 13, 2002 6:13 pm


Thanks for the picture, It actually does look very similar to chocolat´s scabs. I think I will visit the vet again. What is BNP ointment?

Josephine
Little Jo Wheek

Post   » Tue Aug 13, 2002 6:34 pm


It is Neosporin (Bacitracin-Neomycin-Polymyxin B are the ingredients).

It is not fungal, but an awful bacterial infection. I tried topical chlorhexidine and betadine as well, but the ointment seems to work the best. Systemic (oral/injectable) antibiotics don´t seem to help. I´ve tried several. In addition, I do supplement with extra vitamin C (50 mg) daily. The quality of the hay may or may not have something to do with predisposing the pig to the disease (introducing the scratches where the staph enters the body). I have a hunch immune function is impaired in these pigs. Quality hay is a must for fiber and chewing exercise.

I apply twice daily to the lesions when they are bad and maintain once daily when they are gone. The problem is that the mouth looks completely normal after awhile, but the condition reoccurs/worsens whenever I´ve stopped treatment. I try not to get the ointment in her mouth, but I´m sure a bit is licked. The ingredients aren´t the best for cavies, but I´ve not had a problem thus far and it is the least benign medication that has worked. I would certainly keep an eye on the pig to make sure it is eating/drinking/pooping well. Topical Baytril also works, but it has to be applied more often and stings (I tried it once myself on a scratch). The ointment is moisturizing and a protectant.

This is another case where penicillins might be the best drugs for the job. Unfortunately, they are toxic to cavies and will kill them!
Last edited by Josephine on Tue Aug 13, 2002 6:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Estella

Post   » Wed Aug 14, 2002 7:59 am


Thanks for the information, I made an appointment with another vet tonight and I am going to take the picture and see what they say. I had another look this morning and the scabs look really deep. So I guess it won´t hurt to visit the vet, although Chocolat won´t like me for a while as last time he went it was a prolapsed penis and he really got angry at the vet.

Estella

Post   » Thu Aug 15, 2002 5:04 am


The vet said it was a bacterial infection on top of the viral one already present and that it is really difficult to clear up. She agreed that the picture posted by Josephine was very similar and that she has seen a couple of other guinea pigs with the same problem.
I now have medication to clear the problem. I was given antibiotics (baytril), a pro-biotic to include in his water to help his tummy because of the antibiotic (cannot remember the name). Then vitamin C tables to help his immune sytem and finally an antiseptic wash to bathe the area. I have to take him for a check up next week to see if there is any improvement.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Aug 15, 2002 7:29 am


If you see no or little improvement, you might try the BNP ointment (over the counter). Josephine´s experience has been that oral antibiiotics won´t take care of it.

If your pig stops eating, stop the antibiotic and call your vet.

Josephine
Little Jo Wheek

Post   » Thu Aug 15, 2002 1:04 pm


Probiotics in the water?

Not impressive.

Estella

Post   » Fri Aug 16, 2002 8:01 am


Don´t pro-biotics work then? I have never had any experience with them.
The vet said they were for gp use.
So far he seems ok with the medication still eating well and doing his normal functions. The scabs are not as big as they were and do not seem as formed.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Fri Aug 16, 2002 8:18 am


Her main complaint is the method of delivery. Putting anything in the water can have negative consequences (tastes funny, animal doesn´t drink as much, unknown delivery of drug added).

She has heard that many probiotics don´t really make it past the stomach and into the intestines. Fresh poops from a healthy pig reported have a coating enabling that bacteria to make it back into the intestinal tract.

Sprinkling a very tiny amount on a wet leaf just before feeding, a couple hours after giving medication, should work much better than putting anything in the water.

Estella

Post   » Sun Aug 18, 2002 12:51 pm


Thanks for clearing that up. I thought when I saw Josephine´s note, that the probiotics maybe bad for him. I understand your point about Water based delivery systems and agree totally.
What I have been doing is dipping grass and vegetables in the water so there is a good covering of medicated water on the leaf and hand feeding him with these. His appitite is still as strong as ever, so he greedily munches down the medicine. The main antiobiotic is fed by syringe into the mouth so that is always measured.

I have an extra bowl of ordinary water so he still drinks enough.

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