Maggots: Blowfly Strike--very serious, under vet care

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Teresa

Post   » Fri Nov 29, 2002 8:51 pm


This story is interesting but very sad. Started with a call asking me if someone can go to jail for stealing a guinea pig.

Long story short: A neighbor of this person's mother (occasional GL poster) abandoned their exposed outdoor guinea pig and rabbit over this Thanksgiving holiday. Mother and daughter went to check up on the animals--they were suspicious. Found the guinea pig in a deplorable state and took it. Rabbit is MIA. Tons of flies. Eggs, etc.

They had an appt for the vet in the evening. I advised immediate vet visit. This was a very busy day at the vet. They finally got in. It's pretty bad, worms are eating the inside out of the animal. Current protocol as I know it: subq fluids, flushing out the entry points, antibiotics. They are shaving the rump area as well.

Any suggestions on additional treatment? I'm not sure what they are flushing with. Is there any medication that will help kill them? The vet is keeping her overnight.

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lisam

Post   » Fri Nov 29, 2002 9:16 pm


I wish I could help. I think there is some information on blowflies on The House Rabbit Society website.

www.rabbit.org

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jenny

Post   » Fri Nov 29, 2002 9:27 pm


Poor little baby! I hate hearing all these stories about moron people! Just HOW MANY can there be in the world???

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lisam

Post   » Fri Nov 29, 2002 9:52 pm


http://search.atomz.com/search/?sp-a=00062824-sp00000000&sp-f=iso-8859-1&sp-q=maggots

Here is the result of my search at the House Rabbit website.

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melcvt00

Post   » Fri Nov 29, 2002 9:57 pm


There are reports of Capstar (short-acting pill used to kill fleas) causing maggots to back out. Anyone know if Capstar is safe for guinea pigs and rabbits?

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Fri Nov 29, 2002 10:25 pm


Do you have Harkness and Wagner's book (The Biology and Medicine of Rabbits and Rodents)?

They mention shaving the hair, surgical preparation of the skin, killing the larva with chloroform or other anesthetic, opening the pore surgically and removing the larva intact, keeping the wound dry and clean to faciliatate rapid healing. Ivermectin doesn't work well as dead larva can be potentially fatal.

It sounds nasty and painful. Cuterebra I guess are the larvae of bot-flies. This is called myiasis (fly strike). I hope the larvae can be found and removed.

Josephine
Little Jo Wheek

Post   » Fri Nov 29, 2002 10:50 pm


Lynx: Cuterebra are not a problem in the SF Bay Area as far as I know. They are burrowing larvae that leave "breathing holes" in the skin. Removal must be done carefully, since squeezing or traumatizing the larva can cause host shock and death. I think it is more common in rabbits (or anything housed outdoors). I know it is a problem in the midwest USA. They must and should be surgically removed under anesthetic.

The pig probably has problems secondary to parasitism and toxicity from the maggot larvae. We usually clean up the animals, shaving, antibiotics, antimicrobials in and on wounds, and flush, flush, flush those buggers out. There are sprays that will kill them, but I would not consider them in cavies. I hadn't heard the Capstar thing, but of course since it is new there is not any precedent. Certainly from its pharmacokinetics, it should not hurt the cavy. I don't know if it would help, though.

Nutritional support, fluids, antibiotics, wound flushing and topical treatment--I think that's about it. Poor piggy. We usually use chlorhexidine or dilute betadine, although physiological saline or LRS would be gentle as well.

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Teresa

Post   » Sat Nov 30, 2002 12:28 am


Sounds like that's what they are doing. It's on an IV. Leebee had to go to the vet tonight to pick up her pig and checked on her for me. Said she was alert, pooping, eating, dry wheeking.

Thanks. Fingers crossed.

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Paravati
I GAVE, dammit!

Post   » Sat Nov 30, 2002 3:09 am


Dry wheeking.. That's the first time I've heard that term. Does that indicate anything specifically? One of our rescue pigs dry wheeks. She sounds like she has no voicebox.

Josephine
Little Jo Wheek

Post   » Sat Nov 30, 2002 11:12 pm


Usually ill pig.

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Paravati
I GAVE, dammit!

Post   » Sat Nov 30, 2002 11:50 pm


Well, she's been on antibiotics for a URI for a while, and she seems better but is still dry wheeking. I was almost getting ready to assume that's just HOW she wheeked. I guess I'll look at her more closely. Thanks, J

kleenmama
I GAVE, dammit!

Post   » Sun Dec 01, 2002 1:04 am


Seemee has no voice. It took the longest time in a room of 56 pigs to try and determine who was wheeking with air only, no noise.
When I got down to 9 pigs, I could finally figure it out.

She is not sick, but she has no voice. So now I know to call it dry wheeking.

Josephine
Little Jo Wheek

Post   » Sun Dec 01, 2002 3:54 pm


I have noticed differences in wheeking. I have noticed it in my ill pigs or pigs that have recovered from a recent illness. Perhaps they can also go hoarse from wheeking or other laryngeal damage as do dogs?

kleenmama
I GAVE, dammit!

Post   » Sun Dec 01, 2002 5:35 pm


Yeah, most of my pigs I can tell who is screaming at me by the tone, and sick pigs do have a different sound.

Ollie is extremely loud, Buttercup is persistent, and Pebbles is higher pitched. Punkin is not loud, and has a really low pitched wheek. Seemee's is just air. Jackie's is very similar to Pebbles, I have a hard time telling those two apart. Angel is loud, high, and long.

I'm wondering on the ill pigs if it has something to do with slight dehydration? Or just weakness? I have no knowledge of dogs at all. Mine all bark just fine. Sigh.

Leslie V

Post   » Mon Dec 02, 2002 11:31 am


I want to thank everyone (especially Teresa!) for the concern and information regarding the rescue pig with blowfly strike. I'm happy to report that the piggy (Puddles) has survived thus far! Although she is still very thin and weak, she was brought home late Saturday afternoon apparently maggot-free. She's on antibiotics, of course, and a cream needs to be rubbed into her butt as well but hopefully she's well on the road to complete recovery. I will never forget her face when my Mom and I found her covered with flies. Her eyes were half closed and she was real weak but she still stretched her little head up toward our voices as if to say "Please help get me out of here, please!!!!" I'm so glad we were able to and thank you all again for your concern. I'll keep you posted!

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leebee

Post   » Mon Dec 02, 2002 11:39 am


Oh Leslie, I'm so glad you were able to save her, and it's so great to hear an update! I was the one who saw her on Friday night - she is really beautiful and sweet. Poor thing.

Please keep us updated on her progress!

Julian
I GAVE, dammit!

Post   » Mon Dec 02, 2002 1:46 pm


I'm so glad you rescued her. There is no exscuse for maggots. The owner should be the one in jail. Poor piggy.

I'm glad you were able to find the resources and take action.

Why does the Bay Area seem to have an abundance of idiots?

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