Flystrike

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Gimlipig

Post   » Thu Nov 02, 2006 1:25 pm


I just got a pig in that I believe is suffering from fly strike. She has maggots on her bottom and is not eating. I've been treating with bactrim since two nights ago. Can anyone give me information on how to treat her? Is a vet visit required for this or can I do things at home? I'm hand feeding and watering.

EDIT: I just wanted to note I think she has improved since two nights ago. She was more listless and squeeling in pain once in a while. She wasn't even eating veggies. Now there are no squeels and she is eating her veggies. She seems a bit more energetic, but still not quite the same.

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Mum
I GAVE, dammit!

Post   » Thu Nov 02, 2006 1:34 pm


How did she get flystrike? Is she housed outside?

I believe the vet will need to debrade the dead tissue. I'd get her in asap. At the very least she'll need pain meds I would think, apart from the antibiotics.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Nov 02, 2006 1:35 pm


Can you remove the maggots? From what I understand, some maggots only eat dead flesh and actually do a service if there is a severe injury (though it looks horrible). It's important if you remove the maggots to clean things out well. You don't want to kill them and have them decompose in the wound.

Sorry I have no further info (and my advice looks kind of mixed but I imagine you get the message).

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Gimlipig

Post   » Thu Nov 02, 2006 1:38 pm


She was kept inside. A girl who gave her to me because she was acting weird had her in an apartment and didn't keep her cage clean, got a fly infestation in the apartment, and you can see where it goes from there. Will be removing maggots now, I just noticed them this morning.

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Gimlipig

Post   » Thu Nov 02, 2006 1:47 pm


Just called our cavy vet office. The cavy vet is out for "a couple of months" but the secretary is phoning her to ask her what to do.

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rshevin

Post   » Thu Nov 02, 2006 2:00 pm


What's the standard of care for horses/cows with this condition?

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Mum
I GAVE, dammit!

Post   » Thu Nov 02, 2006 2:03 pm



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mkkayla
Supporter in '14

Post   » Thu Nov 02, 2006 2:46 pm


She needs to see a vet. If there are maggots there is dead tissue, if there is dead tissue a debridement is needed. I would think that this would qualify for animal neglect at the least, abuse possibly. That is terrible. I am glad she is in your hands now.

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gotcavies
Supporter in '15

Post   » Thu Nov 02, 2006 3:00 pm


There actually doesn't have to be dead tissue to get them started. Just dirty or even just urinated on fur for the flies to lay the eggs.

If there are now wounds from the maggots, antiobiotics need to be considered.

I can handle just about anything. Maggots make me seriously ill however. I'll deal with them, but I do it while gagging. This poor guinea pig.

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Gimlipig

Post   » Thu Nov 02, 2006 7:37 pm


Yeah, it was pretty gross. I hate maggots too. The vet shaved her backside and said she didn't see any sores. She looked at a urine sample and said that there were a few blood cells in it, so she might possibly have a UTI. I think she thinks the maggots were just there, and aren't whats causing this pig to be sick. She gave injectable ivermectin and another oral ivermectin for 10 days from now. Gave me more bactrim as well.

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lisam

Post   » Thu Nov 02, 2006 7:44 pm


Poor pig. Good there weren't any sores. Best wishes for a speedy recovery for her.

klynne

Post   » Thu Nov 02, 2006 9:32 pm


Be very careful with this one--flystrike can be deadly for a number of reasons.

Maggots can and do also eat healthy tissue, and often invade internally through mucous membranes. Rectal/vaginal routes are common.

Maggots also release a toxic substance when crushed, so if any are (gag) smushed when removing them, and the skin is broken, it can cause a shock reaction in the affected animal.

Abscesses can form around maggot wounds, the animal can go septic, etc.

A pox on anyone who keeps an animal in conditions to be susceptible to this.

If you can find a knowledgeable vet, at least a partial bath/dunking is probably in order, and the pigs' nether regions need to be searched thoroughly for signs of internal infestation.

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Gimlipig

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 1:08 am


She's acting better, seems more energetic and she's eating and drinking. Her weight is up too.

However she has a fowl smelling discharge coming out of her bottom. From what I can tell its cloudy colored, like urine, but thicker and like I said, quite smelly. Her bowl movements look fine, possibly bits of mucous on them but I think that is coming from what ever kind of discharge this is.

Other than that she's acting just fine. Is this her clearing out her system or possibly a consequence of the antibiotics (SMZ-TMP Sulfa)? What do you guys think?

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Fossil Barb

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 1:43 am


The maggots may have invaded internal tissue in which case she needs to go back to the vet. This could be fatal. Good luck to resolving the problem and a pox on the person responsible. Don't forget the acidophilus about 2 hours after ABs.

klynne

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 4:11 am


Fossil is right. That's what I was warning of when I posted on 11-3. Hope that's not it, but vet check in order ASAP, sorry.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 8:29 am


In my small experience, bactrim results in a sweet smelling pig when it takes care of a urinary tract infection. I second these comments (it should not smell bad).

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Fossil Barb

Post   » Sun Nov 05, 2006 9:39 am


Read Klynne's post 11-3 again. If the maggots have moved internally and they may have already done that before your visit to the vet but went unnoticed, whether she's 'acting better' or not she needs to be rechecked ASAP because she's in a world of hurt.

Bad smells (that aren't related to flatulence and cecal poop) indicate that something is seriously wrong in most cases. Better to have it checked and find another cause and treat, than to let the maggots attack more tissue if that's what has happened.

Keep us posted. Poor baby.

TCsHuman

Post   » Mon Nov 06, 2006 10:04 am


I always thought maggots will not eat healthy tissue as it says in this article. I am going to keep searching for information that says otherwise.

Poor piggie. I am surprised such a sensitive animal can survive such neglect. I think I will go hug all my pigs now.

http://72.14.203.104/search?q=cache:X5PnZAIWd9sJ:library.thi ... ct=clnk&cd=1

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Mon Nov 06, 2006 10:12 am


I get the feeling it depends on what kind of maggot it is.

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Mum
I GAVE, dammit!

Post   » Mon Nov 06, 2006 10:19 am


However she has a fowl smelling discharge coming out of her bottom. From what I can tell its cloudy colored, like urine, but thicker and like I said, quite smelly. Her bowl movements look fine, possibly bits of mucous on them but I think that is coming from what ever kind of discharge this is.
Perhaps pyometra should be ruled out?

I'd get her back to the vet asap.

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