Early stage cataract photos out there?

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TwoWhitePiggies

Post   » Mon Dec 04, 2006 2:13 am


We noticed that Henry's eyes seem a little cloudier than they used to. I'm wondering if anyone has a picture of eyes with early stage cataracts that we could look at?

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piggiemomma5372

Post   » Mon Dec 04, 2006 6:29 am


http://www.guinealynx.info/forums/viewtopic.php?p=965959#965959

I think we may have the same problem check out this thread.

TwoWhitePiggies

Post   » Mon Dec 04, 2006 9:28 am


I can't believe I missed your thread! Thanks for the link.

I had noticed the slight cloudiness before, but I thought it was my imagination. Then Jim mentioned it last night. Grandpa Henry is somewhere between seven-and-a-half and eight years old.

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piggiemomma5372

Post   » Mon Dec 04, 2006 9:45 am


No problem I think we posted about the same time.

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lisam

Post   » Mon Dec 04, 2006 10:40 am


My older girl is getting cataracts, and older pigs I've had in the past have had them at the ends of their lives. One vet says that if a pig lives long enough it will eventually develop them. Just how long that would be he didn't say.

Josephine
Little Jo Wheek

Post   » Mon Dec 04, 2006 1:08 pm


Hmmm... That's interesting lisam. I wonder if this vet has seen a lot of cataracts in cavies? I have had dozens of pigs in the 6-7+ age range and so far have not had a single one with cataracts. Osseous choristomas in about 10-20%, but not cataracts.

TwoWhitePiggies

Post   » Mon Dec 04, 2006 2:15 pm


He still seems to be able to see. It's just the slightest haze...almost like if you stepped into a kitchen after taking something frying off the stove.

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lisam

Post   » Mon Dec 04, 2006 2:25 pm


I don't know. It seems to me that most cavies he sees probably pass away from assorted things before they get that old! I had two older girls who had cataracts when they died (the vet mentioned that they had them--no formal diagnosis or necropsy was done).

TwoWhitePiggies

Post   » Mon Dec 04, 2006 4:13 pm


Well, Henry is at least 7.5 - 8 years old. It might explain why he isn't climbing the ramp any more. That, or the fact that he has gained eight ounces of weight since he's moved in with us.

TwoWhitePiggies

Post   » Wed Dec 06, 2006 10:26 am


Good news. While we were at K-State to see Gilbert, Dr. Swenson looked at Henry's eyes and said it was nuclear sclerosis, a natural part of the aging process in eyes. She said that it usually doesn't affect the animal's vision.

purrie

Post   » Wed Dec 06, 2006 10:35 am


Oh thank goodness. I was worried you all had another tough illness to deal with.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Wed Dec 06, 2006 1:15 pm


I have two sources that have different info:

http://depts.washington.edu/ophthweb/cataract.html

It seems that there are three types of human cataracts; nuclear sclerosis, cortical, and posterior subcapsular.

Other source says a cataract is not a nuclear sclerosis:

http://www.vetmed.iastate.edu/services/vth/clinical/ophth/faq-vet.asp

"Nuclear sclerosis is an age-related change in the density of the lens nucleus that occurs in all older animals. The nucleus takes on a gray, cloudy appearance but this has no appreciable effect on vision. It is not uncommon for nuclear sclerosis to be confused with cataract. "

TwoWhitePiggies

Post   » Wed Dec 06, 2006 2:39 pm


When I looked at wikipedia, it said that the veterenary definition of nuclear sclerosis is different from the human definition:

"Although nuclear sclerosis may describe a type of early cataract in human medicine[2], in veterinary medicine the term is also known as lenticular sclerosis and describes a bluish-grey haziness at the nucleus that may not affect vision."

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Wed Dec 06, 2006 4:14 pm


Interesting. I'm a little hesitant to rely on wikipedia (given where stuff comes from) but that would explain it.

TwoWhitePiggies

Post   » Wed Dec 06, 2006 4:33 pm


Very true, Lynx. I double-checked and the source for what I quoted is: Cassin, B. and Solomon, S. Dictionary of Eye Terminology. Gainsville, Florida: Triad Publishing Company, 1990.

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